Senior Swimmer Sets Freestyle World Record

World records and the elderly don’t usually ring a bell, unless you’re talking giant casseroles. All the same, some aren’t letting the “old and wretched” stereotype fly, especially not George Corones. The Australian swimmer recently broke the 50-meter long course record by 35 seconds — and he’s 99-years-old!

“It was an exemplary swim for me, well balanced… and I was ready to hit the [wall] at the end very hard with my hand,” he [said].

The superstar senior swam the length in just 56.12 seconds, for the 100 – 104 years men’s category. I didn’t even know people lived that long. Corones’ swimming career was put on hold during World War II and re-commenced at the age of 80.

“I gave it up at the beginning of the war [World War Two], and I don’t think I had a swim of any description until I retired,” he added.

“I started swimming again for exercise.”

Looks like exercise brought this aging man of steel a long, long way! (To the Commonwealth Games trials, to be exact)

--> Help make the world a better place by sharing this story with your friends:

Lifeguards Use Rescue Drone To Save Swimmers

Showing off an arsenal of life-saving capabilities, drones have been tending to rural patients at a shocking rate. Treatment lies in the form of deliveries, mostly medical tools and blood packets. In any event, the machinery itself hasn’t yet made any direct rescues — until making its way to New South Wales. On account of his search drone, lifeguard Jai Sheridan managed to save two drowning boys.

“I was able to launch it, fly it to the location, and drop the pod all in about one to two minutes,” Sheridan said.

The drone, meant to scout for sharks, ejects a detachable floatation device. The boys, about half a mile into the water, safely paddled to shore on the floater. Sheridan’s “miracle” drone isn’t like any other in that you won’t be able to score it at your local Apple store.

It was a sophisticated UAV called “Little Ripper” described by its corporate sponsor, Westpac, as having a carbon fibre air frame and aircraft grade aluminum components.

Drones are tricky things — but their new and improved counterparts are surely making up for past slip-ups.

--> Help make the world a better place by sharing this story with your friends:

Swimming Robot Can Detect Water Pollution

There is no denying the value of robots. They have not only helped us perform difficult tasks like surgery — they have also assisted in data gathering and analysis. This swimming robot developed in Switzerland can detect water pollution and wirelessly send out information in real time.

The robotic eel is outfitted with sensors that make it able to test the water for changes in conductivity and temperature as well as signs of toxins. The robot is made of several modules, each containing a small electric motor and different sensors. The modular design allows researchers to add or take from its length and change the robot’s make up as needed for each task.

Not only are these robotic “eels” more efficient than manual measurement stations — they don’t disturb a lake’s inhabitants. They are also advanced enough to calculate biological changes. Bacteria in these sensors easily recognize toxins.

For instance, the bacteria will luminesce when exposed to even very low concentrations of mercury. Luminometers measure the light given off by the bacteria and that information is transmitted to a central hub for analysis.

As taken from its namesake, the robot can slither towards the polluting source in any body of water. While they are human creations, it seems about time to give robots some credit!

--> Help make the world a better place by sharing this story with your friends:

Beachgoers Form Human Chain To Save Swimmers

In a world suffering from hate crimes, I often doubt society and its ability to be kind. However, some people continue to give me hope–including this group of beachgoers. In an attempt to save 9 people from a riptide, 80 people formed a human chain, showing up law enforcement officers who did nothing.

Five volunteers began linking arms — reaching only a short way into the water. Then 10 more joined in. Soon, around 80 people were linked together — stretching toward the quickly tiring group.

Law enforcement had already been called, but decided it would be best to wait for a rescue boat.

Now that’s heroic! Each of the 9 saved were family members, one of whom had experienced a heart attack in the water. All were rescued within an hour.

“To see people from different races and genders come into action to help TOTAL strangers is absolutely amazing to see!!” [volunteer] Simmons wrote in a Facebook post. “People who didn’t even know each other went HAND IN HAND IN A LINE, into the water to try and reach them. Pause and just IMAGINE that.”

With videos of the rescue going viral on social media, I didn’t have to do much imagining. I guess this goes to show that in a pretty small world there are still big hearts.

--> Help make the world a better place by sharing this story with your friends: