Your S.O. Doesn’t Have to be a Lover — It Might Be a Stranger in Need

It’s no secret that the idea of finding a soulmate or at least someone that you could spend your life with has enchanted people for centuries. We cannot deny that romantic love is one of the biggest aspects of our lives. From all the world’s love songs to romantic comedy films, from museum art to television commercials, from poems to Facebook photo albums, that kind of love is constantly promoted to us by various forms of media.

One of the grandest days of every year is even dedicated to that idea; once a year, every corner is filled with figures of baby angels and big old hearts punctured by a golden arrow, dozens and dozens of roses, stacks and stacks of chocolate boxes, stuffed toys, sometimes even expensive jewelry, and all of that cheesy Valentine’s merchandise.

Now of course not everybody has the same cheesy dreams to chase. Some believe in milder or not-so-cliché notions of romance. You might have understood love through a simple story of how your parents met at an elevator at the workplace one day and just started talking, which led to 30 years (and counting!) of marriage. Or you might have appreciated it as you spot an adorable couple just chilling out and individually reading books together at a coffee shop. Maybe you currently have a significant other, and you fall in love with her a little bit more every time you watch her earnestly solving crossword puzzles. These are all notions of romantic love as well.

However, so many people also lose their minds over love. Believing that they cannot exist without their romantic partner, they lose sight of everything once the relationship ends. Or hopelessly waiting for the attention of the person who do not love them the same way, they waste years and years of their lives. I can’t begin to fathom the number of heartbroken humans in the world right now.

Meanwhile, I know some people who are in the single-and-not-really-enjoying-it boat, because they are so fixated in finally having a significant other. I have a friend who regularly asks me to match her up with someone or pretty much anyone I know (which is a recipe for disaster, I tell you), and then ends up at my apartment crying on my shoulder whenever her Tinder dates go badly. I can’t tell if she is just bored or doesn’t know what else to do with her life, but I do think my friend is a good person who has a lot of love to share. She just hasn’t found the right one to share her heart with.

For all of you who are in a similar situation, this is what I told her a few times before: there are other kinds of affection that you can choose to share with people now. You can even give some love with a stranger in need. You don’t need to be romantically involved just to give love and be loved. There’s too much kindness, tenderness, and happiness to be given in the world, just for all of it to be caged inside us as we wait for Prince or Princess Charming. Romantic love isn’t the ultimate kind of love; there are many, and it’s just one of them.

For instance, we can pour our love towards our family members. Take your mom and sister out to brunch or a makeover and spa day every once in a while. Also, your mom and dad will certainly appreciate if you arrange a fancy date night for them, one they probably haven’t had for some time now. Shower your pets with affection — I’m sure it’s going to be incredibly fulfilling to be reminded of how sweet they can really be. Stop looking for prospects during a girls’ night out, forget all about the boys, and really have some fun with each other. Stop taking the people (and lovable pets?) around you for granted while looking for somebody else to love.

There is also much to learn when you go out into the world to seek new connections, and not necessarily in the romantic sense. Maybe your significant other isn’t supposed to be a lover; maybe your love and affection can go instead to a stranger in need. Spend your hours volunteering at a home for the elderly. Teach your passions to the kids in the community. Help someone out at the grocery. Sharing your kindness to a stranger in need is another type of love that is just as pure and meaningful.

The BeepBeep Nation app has the mission of making the world a better place and encouraging everyone to share their love and affection by being kind to a stranger in need. By providing a platform to connect people who want to request for help and others who can offer that help, BeepBeep Nation enables people to be more compassionate and more loving.

Fuelled by the EMINENT token, “The Mother of All Apps” features many categories of help that people can give or get. BeepBeep Nation users will have endless opportunities to enjoy face-to-face social interactions and meet interesting people.

Check out the EMINENT token pre-sale now, and learn more about BeepBeep Nation. By promoting kindness in the world, you just might find yourself having many significant others. And by offering your help to a stranger in need, you just might offer your heart as well.

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Business Networking: BeepBeep Nation and Intangible Profit

I’ve been in the game for a while now. In the world of business, it’s not enough to be efficient, effective, and generally adept at your tasks. What’s more important than the mechanical side of whatever industry is securing good relationships and establishing a broad network of contacts. Dealing with administrative and operational matters should not overshadow putting yourself and your company out there and meeting great people.

There are some traditional means of business networking. Setting up events to gather potential clients and affiliates is always on the table — there is always an opportune time for a semi-casual party, a formal program to an organization you want to sponsor, an official launch of a new product, or others. Attending trade shows and business conferences is also very conducive to building a network; whether as an attendee or a speaker, you’ll get the chance to meet people and stimulate their interests.

In these areas, making a good impression is of utmost priority. Hard selling one’s business may not always be the most effective approach. Sometimes, keeping the conversation light, fun, but engaging may be even more beneficial. This is your one shot at establishing a connection, so actually getting to know a few great prospects is better than having a standard robotic speech for everyone. Aggressive methods are also not recommended as you do not want to scare away your prospects.

Talking about your passions and listening to them talk about their passions is a good step to ensuring a followup sometime soon. Remembering the humanity of the people that you’re talking to while talking to them leads to more fulfilling, more secure relationships in the future. This is true for both our professional and personal lives.

Of course, in the digital age, there are updated ways of achieving the same goal. Social media sites such as LinkedIn, Twitter, and other online communities are a good way to promote your business and establish a more secure network of potential clients and affiliates. Nowadays, it’s actually unusual for any business not to have its own website or blog to express its philosophy, share its take on relevant industry issues, provide information requisite to the business, and enable interactions with its current audience and eventual prospects.

Being in business also means committing to things that do not instantly scream profit! at your face. It may feel counterintuitive at times to do things for free, especially in a world where it’s easier to look only at price tags and consider nothing else. But profit isn’t always immediately tangible in business networking.

Sometimes, a long-lasting excellent reputation is worth way more than an instant sell. Offering your help and expertise to people who seem to have issues that you can address might be mutually favorable. Again, while you don’t want to be aggressive, taking the initiative is a good habit. Not only are there possibilities of people eagerly returning favors some other time, helping out may eventually lead to your reputation as a generous person.

To this end, it’s also good to look for opportunities to volunteer your time. Business networking doesn’t require your focus to solely be on your own business; venturing into other fields can actually give you an even broader network. Volunteering in the community gets you in touch with other groups of people who may not seem relevant at first, but could prove helpful in the future.

Inculcating this in yourself will make you appreciate the value of everyone you meet and inspire you to get to know even more people in a deeper way.

One such app that aims to facilitate these connections and encourage people to have fulfilling face-to-face social interactions is BeepBeep Nation. By providing a platform for requestors to get any kind of help they need and for helpers to offer their capacity to help out, what BeepBeep Nation wants is to create a helping economy that will be beneficial for all of its users.

It may seem a little strange to lend a hand without getting anything in return, but as I’ve illustrated regarding business networking, what it provides you is more long-term yield. Simply giving someone a ride or a place to stay for the night is already a huge investment. BeepBeep Nation offers a plethora of these opportunities: aside from a ride or a place to stay, you can assist in medical emergencies and vehicle breakdowns, you may merely give accurate information regarding the restaurant your requestor wants to check out, and other forms of help.

You never know, the person you gave a recommendation for a quaint local café might just be your next great business partner.

Go to the BeepBeep Nation website to find out how to get started. Fuelled by the EMINENT token, BeepBeep Nation is set to launch soon worldwide, starting in selected cities. The EMINENT token pre-sale is currently live, with great bonuses available. Check it out now, and don’t hesitate to participate in a world of change.

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In Your 20s? 30s? 40s? Age Doesn’t Matter in Meaningful Interactions

All too often, we hear ominous stories about how adulthood can take away our “lives.” My guy friends, for instance, would always talk about settling down as if it means giving up the freedoms they currently have — no more regular basketball live-streaming with their mates, no more beer pong and video game weekends. My girl friends would also freak out a little when imagining their lives as a soccer mom, when their everyday would be consumed by helping kids get ready in the morning, bringing them to school, doing stuff around the house, fetching kids from school, and repeating the cycle all over the next day.

But I always felt like this isn’t necessarily the case. We romanticize the idea of peaking during our high school or college years, thinking that’s when we live the best of our lives because we have the best people around us. Everything else that comes after is just the natural course of things after the end of our glory days. I disagree. For me, meaningful interactions are not necessarily limited to our youth.

Of course, our teenage years are fraught with self-discovery. That’s when we first have an inkling of our passions and the things we like to do. High school is a time to try out your interests and maybe decide what to pursue in the future. But aside from discovering your identity, it is also a time to have fun with friends and make the craziest, most random memories. Most of us also probably had our first kisses then. I mean, who didn’t go to prom? Being a teenager is like being in a whirlwind of new emotions; it’s fun, adventurous, and romantic.

Unfortunately, some of us stay behind and linger with those memories, choosing instead to idealize those golden days and not to go on and have more adventures, even as an adult. Believing that your teenage years are all there is to life is detrimental to your growth as a person.

I’m sure everyone’s college days were also intense and significant. I, for one, probably had my first real and severe experience of distress during my time in college. Algebra homework in high school? Pfffft. Between my terrifying cultural studies professor who demands a reaction paper on every reading, my thesis that doesn’t seem to want me to graduate, and my fear of unemployment once I do graduate, it’s a whole new level of exhaustion. But this can only mean that our early 20s is a time to harness one’s strengths and start working on maturity.

University is also probably where you get to meet the most diverse set of people. So it’s not just a time to gain fun friends to create crazy memories with, but also to find those who can really help you pursue your goals. Despite of and maybe even because of the raging hormones that are ever-present throughout college, it might also present opportunities to grow into the kind of mature person who can handle actual relationships.

Up to one’s late 20s, I think, is a good time to make mistakes and learn from them, through the different people you meet and the different meaningful interactions that you have, whether romantic or platonic.

I myself am in my mid-20s. And like I’ve mentioned before, real adulthood is what people my age are really afraid of. People in their 30s and 40s are probably more likely to prioritize their careers and families. The assumption is, by then, you will get so caught up in living a normal, stable, and secure life that it just becomes tedious — what meaningful interactions are there for me if I just follow the scripts?

Assuming responsibility is definitely important. But being in one’s 30s or 40s also means extending yourself fully and sharing your life with others. Putting one’s family first doesn’t necessarily entail choosing obligation over passion; maybe it’ll even be fruitful to open up to your kids and have them open up to you about things all of you feel passionate about. Likewise, marriage doesn’t have to kill romance; it can provide a whole different and exciting arena for it.

And finally, because you’ve been working all these years to settle down, now might be a good time to go out and know your community. Meaningful interactions can happen in the seemingly most simple events. Grocery shopping is just a routine, but who knows what interesting people you’ll meet there? Just because you have a home life doesn’t mean no opportunities for spontaneous friendships will make themselves present.

In one’s 30s or 40s, people can’t really afford to rethink their priorities. And they don’t have to. Just treating your neighbors sometime could suffice. Smile at someone in the park. Help a stranger out. Everyone you meet will surely give you a meaningful interaction if you let them.

* This post is inspired by BeepBeep Nation, an app that provides a platform for people to request for the help they need and others to offer their help. By facilitating face-to-face human interaction and creating a culture of kindness, it aims to make the world better. Pre-sale of the ICO that fuels the BeepBeep Nation app is already available. Check out the EMINENT token now!

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AI Mask Visually Communicates Human Emotions

I’ve seen my fair share of extraneous inventions — from automatic toothbrushes to bulletproof skateboards. While they may seem somewhat pointless, they are also incredibly fascinating. In line with these high-tech novelty items is the Hyperface, an AI mask that visually communicates human emotions.

The Hyperface is worn like a visor, but includes a transparent screen to flip in front of the eyes. A screen at the top of the visor reflects an image onto the one over the wearer’s eyes, making it look like a digital face. Someone looking at the wearer would see a pair of digital eyes staring back at them, which change based on the wearer’s facial expressions.

How does the Hyperface analyze what its wearer is feeling? Simple — a secret algorithm. Creator Eun Kyung Shin argues that the technology can even tell when you are interested in someone (or not).

Shin wanted the device to display a person’s emotions as closely as possible. She refers to faces we normally put on in public as ‘social masks,’ especially when people deal with intense situations.

Is the device futile? That depends. While it aims to help with social anxiety, it seems that Hyperface would also attract unwanted attention. It’s not every day you wear a digital face.

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