U.K. Installing Water Vacuums To Collect Waste

Technological advancements such as swimming robots and metallic glass have helped to alleviate water pollution. Despite this, consumers are polluting lakes and oceans quicker than we can restore them. To combat unreliable waste management, Indiegogo creators are taking “Seabins” to the U.K.

The Seabin’s creators say that each unit can collect around 1.5kg of waste a day and hold up to 12kg until it’s full. That amounts to 20,000 plastic bottles or 83,000 plastic bags a year.

At a plump price tag of £3,000, the Seabin is a splurge, but perhaps a necessary one. It functions simply and efficiently and is hardly a struggle to transport.

It houses a combination of a large natural fibre net and a dock-based pump (fed by the hook-like metal pole). This only collects debris floating on top of the water and sucks in surface oils, ensuring fish are safe.

Throw a few dozen Seabins into the Pacific and I’d say oil spills could be the least of anyone’s worries. It’s two thumbs up for this clever device.

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Ørsted Wind Turbine Fleet To Power Millions Of Homes

Renewable wind energy has long ago proven its worth, powering 70% of Australian homes just last year. With its maximum potential still undiscovered, Danish company Ørsted is building a 174-fleet wind farm in the UK. The sustainable solution will power a plentiful million homes.

“After years of planning it is fantastic to see the initial stages of offshore construction begin… These wind farms will not only greatly contribute to the UK’s goal of decarbonising our energy system, they are also bringing jobs and investment to Grimsby and the North East.” [said program director Duncan Clark.]

The 800-ton turbines will make their official debut in 2020, with allowance for transport limitations. On the whole, Ørsted is determined to transition as much of society as it can into green energy users. Still, the group is managing its expectations.

“The government has to change the trajectory or we are going to fail. We need to learn our lessons from where things have gone wrong so far,”

With great ambition comes extreme patience — but I do hope I’m around to see our planet change for the better.

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Lifeguards Use Rescue Drone To Save Swimmers

Showing off an arsenal of life-saving capabilities, drones have been tending to rural patients at a shocking rate. Treatment lies in the form of deliveries, mostly medical tools and blood packets. In any event, the machinery itself hasn’t yet made any direct rescues — until making its way to New South Wales. On account of his search drone, lifeguard Jai Sheridan managed to save two drowning boys.

“I was able to launch it, fly it to the location, and drop the pod all in about one to two minutes,” Sheridan said.

The drone, meant to scout for sharks, ejects a detachable floatation device. The boys, about half a mile into the water, safely paddled to shore on the floater. Sheridan’s “miracle” drone isn’t like any other in that you won’t be able to score it at your local Apple store.

It was a sophisticated UAV called “Little Ripper” described by its corporate sponsor, Westpac, as having a carbon fibre air frame and aircraft grade aluminum components.

Drones are tricky things — but their new and improved counterparts are surely making up for past slip-ups.

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Volunteers Save Beached Whale In Brazil

It’s not everyday hundreds of strangers come together for a greater purpose. Occasionally, 80 people will form a human chain to rescue drowning swimmers. Other times, some 300 volunteers will save a beached whale. In fact, the feat actually occurred recently.

Throughout the morning, three diggers boosted the efforts of the rescue mission as dozens of people used shovels and hoes to remove the sand, and throw buckets of water over the animal to keep it hydrated.

A handful of rescuers later multiplied into hundreds, but ditch-digging proved to be unsuccessful. Volunteers chose not to move the Humpback in fear of damaging its internal organs. Things took a hopeful turn when the marine puppy made its own effort to wiggle its way back to sea. Presumably, the situation was an ordinary case of a young whale’s wonky internal GPS.

According to experts, the puppy may have got lost from the group it was traveling with when crossing the Rio coast bound for the Antarctica. The migration usually takes place at this time of year.

After 24 hours, the 7-ton baby beast refloated into the South Atlantic Ocean. It appeared to thank its volunteers with a wave of its fin — a total breath of fresh air. Or perhaps a breath of salty water?

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Deep-Sea Canoe Travels Around The World In 3 Years

There is no denying that people are capable of achieving the impossible. This Hawaiian deep-sea canoe brigade is no exception, having circumnavigated the globe in just 3 years. What makes the feat even more impressive is that the Hōkūle’a did so using only Polynesian navigational methods.

“Hokule’a’s crew would forgo up-to-date technology, using celestial navigation to prove that ancient Polynesians used only the stars, sun, moon, wind, and waves to travel to the islands in the Pacific. It would prove that the crew’s ancestors were not simply blown off course to Hawaii — that they were expert voyagers, who sailed with a purpose.”

The voyage, first envisioned in the 1970s, took years to plan. The style of canoe that navigators intended to build had not been accomplished for nearly 600 years.  This made it difficult to construct — something I can relate to, as I sometimes have trouble pitching simple tents. When it was finally time to sail, Hōkūle’a embarked on “Mālama Honua” or “Care For The Earth.”

Its goal was to reach environmentalists, scientists, concerned citizens, and children around the world, finding common ground in their desire to protect the planet. Hōkūle’a would “connect with communities who care for the health of the oceans and our shared island, Earth.”

Hōkūle’a traveled to 150 different ports in 23 countries and is now embarking on a Hawaiian tour. That’s what I call perseverance!

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