Dogs Love Baby Talk, Study Says

Dear dog moms and dog dads, fret not. When your pup saves people from a house fire, learns a new trick that would make the family proud, or simply behaves like the good boy that he is, you are not delusional to spend a few minutes babying him. You don’t even need to get him a comfy armchair or mouth-watering treats, researchers at York University say that dogs appreciate baby talk or high-pitched “dog speak.”

“Obviously we know that dogs can’t learn to talk, so we wanted to know whether dog-speak also has a function for dogs, or whether it is simply something we tend to use with our pets in a culture where we think of dogs as part of the family, like fur-babies,” lead author Alex Benjamin told HuffPost […]

The researchers wanted to see if the dogs were interested in the high-pitched intonation used for them or if they were responding to the actual words said to them. After conducting speech tests with 69 adult ones, the research team discovered that dogs were most likely to engage with people who mix dog-directed speech (high-pitched tone) and dog-related content (“Who’s a good boy? You’re a good boy!”).

“I was a little surprised that in the second experiment, neither content, nor prosody ― which [is] intonation of the voice ― was driving the dogs’ preference,” she said. “I think it is really interesting that our dogs are able to use both acoustic and content information to determine what speech might be meant for them.”

So next time, when somebody says that you’re just being a crazy dog mom or dad, give them the scientific basis of your adoration. Perhaps using baby talk could help you guys communicate, too.

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The Social Nature of Humans and Making the Most of It

From philosophy to neurology, from psychology to religion, from anthropology to biology, it has been argued that humans are, in their very nature, social beings. And who are we to refute than, when our everyday lives are composed of enjoying our friends’ selfies, investing in romantic relationships, looking out for the next generation, and even engaging in social media for good causes? The social nature of humans is embedded in our personal lives, the institutions and structures that govern them, our cultures, our histories, our belief systems, the way we acquire and share knowledge, and well, basically everything.

Including the very makeup of our brains. This fascinating finding in neuroscience has recently come up: our brains are inherently social. Neuroscientists investigated the human brain in its non-active state i.e. when the person takes a break and lets his brain rest. When a person has down time, his brain turns on a system called the “default network.”

According to Matthew Lieberman, a famous social psychologist and neuroscientist: “The default network directs us to think about other people’s minds—their thoughts, feelings, and goals.” Basically, whenever we try to chill out, our brains’ automatic response is to think of other people. This mirrors the history of our evolution as humans, since we all know that species which work well together have definitely shown more chances of survival. Interestingly enough, tracing the origin of our social nature is simply evolutionary.

But then again, through thousands and thousands of years, this evolutionary fact must have manifested in other things. For instance, in the way we experience pain. Social loss and social rejection may seem different from, say, bruises or wounds, but our brains seem to process them the same way. And here’s a good explanation behind that:

A broken leg and a broken heart seem like very different forms of pain. But there are evolutionary reasons why our brains process social pain the way they process physical pain. Pain is a sign that something is wrong. Social pain signals that we are all alone—that we are vulnerable—and need to either form new connections or rekindle old ones to protect ourselves against the many threats that are out there.

No man is an island, indeed. While we definitely have basic needs like water, food, air, and shelter, social connections may as well be in the same category. That’s what we can say for the way humans scientifically evolved as a species. Unfortunately, the way human society has evolved seems to be counterintuitive. Over the years, our lifestyles have grown to be more individualistic, partly due to the economy, partly due to technology, though other factors come into play. The point is this: we steadfastly seem to grow apart from each other, against our evolution and our biology.

These days, we seem to keep defying our social nature as we let our social connections dissolve. We could spend a long amount of time working our bodies off, forgetting whom we work for. We pursue our ambitions, sometimes putting aside our loved ones, losing our grip on the fact that we won’t have the motivation and inspiration to succeed in the first place without them. We convince ourselves to be content seeing each other as pixels on computer or phone screens.

BeepBeep Nation has an answer to this dilemma. It ironically reverses the current trend in technology of creating distance between people, and instead uses the very potential of technology in developing our social nature. By providing a platform to connect people who need help and people who can offer it, the BeepBeep Nation app seeks to give its users the opportunity to be as social as they want and need to be.

The provision of help through the BeepBeep Nation app requires an actual physical meetup between a requestor and a helper, so in addition to encouraging a culture of kindness, it also intensely promotes face-to-face human interactions. Since its very mission of making the world a better place functions on the basis of our social nature as humans, BeepBeep Nation urges us to make the most of it in our everyday lives.

The EMINENT token which fuels the BeepBeep Nation app is now available for sale. I’m sure it will take time to reflect on the social nature of humans, so while doing some philosophical thinking for yourself, be sure to check that out as well. My final two cents: it might even be better to live out your ideas through BeepBeep Nation. Instead of merely musing about it, let’s participate in a world that is truly more social than ever.

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BeepBeep Nation and Your Dynamic Beep Network of Helpers

Soon to launch is BeepBeep Nation — an app that will offer opportunities for people to request whatever kind of help and others to respond to them. You can get a ride home, read restaurant recommendations, even have a tour guide with just one beep. But what’s underneath this seemingly common service of BeepBeep Nation is a greater mission.

It aims to make the world a better place by fostering a culture of kindness and encouraging face-to-face interaction. By helping others, you get to broaden your circle of peers, build a stronger business network, or even just have nonchalant but interesting conversations every now and then.

As a true social app, BeepBeep Nation requires both requestors and helpers to meet in person when resolving a problem.  Social media has inadvertently made human relationships take a colder, digital turn. Even though it still very much utilizes digital technology, the BeepBeep Nation app harnesses that in order to promote more profound social interactions again. But how exactly does it do that?

Of course, as a social app, the BeepBeep Nation app also has its own way of building an individual’s network for him. However, unlike Facebook or Twitter, it does not ask you to make people your “friends” or “followers.” What it does is provide you with a bigger pool of potential requestors and helpers (i.e. potential peers and business contacts) through its very own Dynamic Beep Network of Helpers (DBN). By not offering the same “friends,” “followers,” or “connections” mechanics, it actually provides its users a more dynamic alternative.

Everyone — yes, everyone! — within a 1-5 mile radius of wherever you are is included in your network. All people need to do is install the BeepBeep Nation app on their smartphones, and they’re good to go. No need for “friend” or “follower” requests. Everyone is that easy to reach.

Another interesting thing about your Dynamic Beep Network Of Helpers (DBN) is that it can be composed of different people every time. Say you are travelling from your hometown of Vancouver to attend a conference in Toronto. Your DBN will change so that you have a different pool of potential acquaintances in Toronto from your DBN in Vancouver. Of course, so that people nearby can help you with your needs or you can help people nearby with theirs, the BeepBeep Nation app will connect you to people in the location you yourself specify at any given time. Amazing.

What’s even more amazing is this implication: a constantly changing DBN means having an endless number of opportunities to get help and give help. Having a previously established or curated network of “friends” and “followers” could set your limits — not just with the help you might acquire, but also the potential peers you may still want to get to know. For instance, you only look for people you want to meet in your own circles; you then scan their profiles if you have mutuals. But your DBN always provides you with new possibilities.

After all, BeepBeep Nation’s mission to make the world a better place starts with an individual helping another person out and getting to know him face-to-face. Its feature of giving users a Dynamic Beep Network Of Helpers (DBN) sincerely embodies that mission. If you’re interested in participating and creating a world of kindness, soon to launch is the BeepBeep Nation app. Its fuel, the EMINENT (EMN) token, is already available for sale. Check it out now!

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The Future of Selfies: Wefies and Beepies!

Almost everyone in the world probably knows what selfies are. In the period between 2015 to 2016, around 24 billion selfies have been posted on the Internet, according to Google’s servers. 24 billion! Sounds unbelievable, right? Even though we get to see our friends’ faces each day on social media — as they cook breakfast, walk their dog, sip a latte, try their hand at yoga, host a baby shower, dress up for a fancy date, dress in sweaters and a comfy hoodie, go to the bathroom, stay in bed, and every other human thing to do, really —  I’m sure it’s still an astounding fact.

The activity of taking a selfie sometimes strikes other people who dislike it as vain and unnecessary. However, history says it has long been a human fascination to look at and have oneself immortalized. Supposedly, the first photographic self-portrait ever has been taken in the 19th century by a chemist and photography enthusiast named Robert Cornelius. And long before that, hundreds and hundreds of people have already had themselves painted by artists or even by themselves throughout the centuries. Just visit an art museum, and you’ll quickly realize we are not so different from many generations before us.

Of course, the function of selfies has already evolved, especially now that we live in the digital era. Some people take selfies so that they can keep their friends updated, maybe about a significant event in their lives or just any usual day, like one that says “good morning” in the caption. Some do it to boost their confidence, especially as they have control over how they appear in the image that they’re going to show the world; they can make sure they look good so that they can feel good. Others do it to remember a moment with their family or friends, whether they’re just hanging out on a regular Saturday afternoon or meeting up for the first time in five years.

There are many reasons to take selfies, but I guess one thing that’s common among them is that they all have to do with memories. As humans, we have an urge to preserve our memories so that we can look back on them any time we want. We want a memory of that time we looked so poised, graceful and ready to take on the world with a little black dress. We want a memory of that time we finished a great hike. We want a memory of that time we made funny faces with our cute nephews. We already know this as we make our online presence felt. But I wonder, is this all there is to selfies? What other purpose could it have?

BeepBeep Nation is an app that seeks to create a more meaningful world by enhancing face-to-face human interaction, albeit facilitating it digitally. It provides a platform for people who need help to seek it among others and then other people to reach out and offer a hand. Aside from enabling people to exercise kindness, it also encourages them to broaden their network of peers and share their lives with more people.

Amazingly, the BeepBeep Nation app has an answer to my question about the future of selfies: wefies and Beepies. The term “wefie” has already been used to refer to a selfie taken with a group of people. Meanwhile, a Beepie is a group picture taken through the BeepBeep Nation app between people who request for help (requestors) and people who provided the help (helpers) during their friendly meetup. By simply clicking on the camera icon in the app, you can easily initiate the process of taking a Beepie with your requestor or helper.

Through the Beepie, BeepBeep Nation redefines what selfies could be in the world of kindness that it seeks to create.

Not only can this feature ensure your personal safety when meeting someone unfamiliar through the app and thus build trust in the BeepBeep Nation community, it can also serve the usual functions of a selfie, but better. Because what greater moment to preserve in our memories than when we choose to help others and share our kindness with them? We never know, we might end up creating a good and lasting friendship with our requestor or helper, and your Beepie will always be a significant first in your relationship. Exciting, I know.

If you’re ready to take on the challenge of sharing your kindness, making the world a better place, and creating exciting friendships (plus taking fantastic selfies with your new friends!), the BeepBeep Nation app is set to launch soon. Its fuel, the EMINENT token, is now available for sale! To get started on BeepBeep Nation, make sure to check it out now.

 

 

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Your S.O. Doesn’t Have to be a Lover — It Might Be a Stranger in Need

It’s no secret that the idea of finding a soulmate or at least someone that you could spend your life with has enchanted people for centuries. We cannot deny that romantic love is one of the biggest aspects of our lives. From all the world’s love songs to romantic comedy films, from museum art to television commercials, from poems to Facebook photo albums, that kind of love is constantly promoted to us by various forms of media.

One of the grandest days of every year is even dedicated to that idea; once a year, every corner is filled with figures of baby angels and big old hearts punctured by a golden arrow, dozens and dozens of roses, stacks and stacks of chocolate boxes, stuffed toys, sometimes even expensive jewelry, and all of that cheesy Valentine’s merchandise.

Now of course not everybody has the same cheesy dreams to chase. Some believe in milder or not-so-cliché notions of romance. You might have understood love through a simple story of how your parents met at an elevator at the workplace one day and just started talking, which led to 30 years (and counting!) of marriage. Or you might have appreciated it as you spot an adorable couple just chilling out and individually reading books together at a coffee shop. Maybe you currently have a significant other, and you fall in love with her a little bit more every time you watch her earnestly solving crossword puzzles. These are all notions of romantic love as well.

However, so many people also lose their minds over love. Believing that they cannot exist without their romantic partner, they lose sight of everything once the relationship ends. Or hopelessly waiting for the attention of the person who do not love them the same way, they waste years and years of their lives. I can’t begin to fathom the number of heartbroken humans in the world right now.

Meanwhile, I know some people who are in the single-and-not-really-enjoying-it boat, because they are so fixated in finally having a significant other. I have a friend who regularly asks me to match her up with someone or pretty much anyone I know (which is a recipe for disaster, I tell you), and then ends up at my apartment crying on my shoulder whenever her Tinder dates go badly. I can’t tell if she is just bored or doesn’t know what else to do with her life, but I do think my friend is a good person who has a lot of love to share. She just hasn’t found the right one to share her heart with.

For all of you who are in a similar situation, this is what I told her a few times before: there are other kinds of affection that you can choose to share with people now. You can even give some love with a stranger in need. You don’t need to be romantically involved just to give love and be loved. There’s too much kindness, tenderness, and happiness to be given in the world, just for all of it to be caged inside us as we wait for Prince or Princess Charming. Romantic love isn’t the ultimate kind of love; there are many, and it’s just one of them.

For instance, we can pour our love towards our family members. Take your mom and sister out to brunch or a makeover and spa day every once in a while. Also, your mom and dad will certainly appreciate if you arrange a fancy date night for them, one they probably haven’t had for some time now. Shower your pets with affection — I’m sure it’s going to be incredibly fulfilling to be reminded of how sweet they can really be. Stop looking for prospects during a girls’ night out, forget all about the boys, and really have some fun with each other. Stop taking the people (and lovable pets?) around you for granted while looking for somebody else to love.

There is also much to learn when you go out into the world to seek new connections, and not necessarily in the romantic sense. Maybe your significant other isn’t supposed to be a lover; maybe your love and affection can go instead to a stranger in need. Spend your hours volunteering at a home for the elderly. Teach your passions to the kids in the community. Help someone out at the grocery. Sharing your kindness to a stranger in need is another type of love that is just as pure and meaningful.

The BeepBeep Nation app has the mission of making the world a better place and encouraging everyone to share their love and affection by being kind to a stranger in need. By providing a platform to connect people who want to request for help and others who can offer that help, BeepBeep Nation enables people to be more compassionate and more loving.

Fuelled by the EMINENT token, “The Mother of All Apps” features many categories of help that people can give or get. BeepBeep Nation users will have endless opportunities to enjoy face-to-face social interactions and meet interesting people.

Check out the EMINENT token pre-sale now, and learn more about BeepBeep Nation. By promoting kindness in the world, you just might find yourself having many significant others. And by offering your help to a stranger in need, you just might offer your heart as well.

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In Your 20s? 30s? 40s? Age Doesn’t Matter in Meaningful Interactions

All too often, we hear ominous stories about how adulthood can take away our “lives.” My guy friends, for instance, would always talk about settling down as if it means giving up the freedoms they currently have — no more regular basketball live-streaming with their mates, no more beer pong and video game weekends. My girl friends would also freak out a little when imagining their lives as a soccer mom, when their everyday would be consumed by helping kids get ready in the morning, bringing them to school, doing stuff around the house, fetching kids from school, and repeating the cycle all over the next day.

But I always felt like this isn’t necessarily the case. We romanticize the idea of peaking during our high school or college years, thinking that’s when we live the best of our lives because we have the best people around us. Everything else that comes after is just the natural course of things after the end of our glory days. I disagree. For me, meaningful interactions are not necessarily limited to our youth.

Of course, our teenage years are fraught with self-discovery. That’s when we first have an inkling of our passions and the things we like to do. High school is a time to try out your interests and maybe decide what to pursue in the future. But aside from discovering your identity, it is also a time to have fun with friends and make the craziest, most random memories. Most of us also probably had our first kisses then. I mean, who didn’t go to prom? Being a teenager is like being in a whirlwind of new emotions; it’s fun, adventurous, and romantic.

Unfortunately, some of us stay behind and linger with those memories, choosing instead to idealize those golden days and not to go on and have more adventures, even as an adult. Believing that your teenage years are all there is to life is detrimental to your growth as a person.

I’m sure everyone’s college days were also intense and significant. I, for one, probably had my first real and severe experience of distress during my time in college. Algebra homework in high school? Pfffft. Between my terrifying cultural studies professor who demands a reaction paper on every reading, my thesis that doesn’t seem to want me to graduate, and my fear of unemployment once I do graduate, it’s a whole new level of exhaustion. But this can only mean that our early 20s is a time to harness one’s strengths and start working on maturity.

University is also probably where you get to meet the most diverse set of people. So it’s not just a time to gain fun friends to create crazy memories with, but also to find those who can really help you pursue your goals. Despite of and maybe even because of the raging hormones that are ever-present throughout college, it might also present opportunities to grow into the kind of mature person who can handle actual relationships.

Up to one’s late 20s, I think, is a good time to make mistakes and learn from them, through the different people you meet and the different meaningful interactions that you have, whether romantic or platonic.

I myself am in my mid-20s. And like I’ve mentioned before, real adulthood is what people my age are really afraid of. People in their 30s and 40s are probably more likely to prioritize their careers and families. The assumption is, by then, you will get so caught up in living a normal, stable, and secure life that it just becomes tedious — what meaningful interactions are there for me if I just follow the scripts?

Assuming responsibility is definitely important. But being in one’s 30s or 40s also means extending yourself fully and sharing your life with others. Putting one’s family first doesn’t necessarily entail choosing obligation over passion; maybe it’ll even be fruitful to open up to your kids and have them open up to you about things all of you feel passionate about. Likewise, marriage doesn’t have to kill romance; it can provide a whole different and exciting arena for it.

And finally, because you’ve been working all these years to settle down, now might be a good time to go out and know your community. Meaningful interactions can happen in the seemingly most simple events. Grocery shopping is just a routine, but who knows what interesting people you’ll meet there? Just because you have a home life doesn’t mean no opportunities for spontaneous friendships will make themselves present.

In one’s 30s or 40s, people can’t really afford to rethink their priorities. And they don’t have to. Just treating your neighbors sometime could suffice. Smile at someone in the park. Help a stranger out. Everyone you meet will surely give you a meaningful interaction if you let them.

* This post is inspired by BeepBeep Nation, an app that provides a platform for people to request for the help they need and others to offer their help. By facilitating face-to-face human interaction and creating a culture of kindness, it aims to make the world better. Pre-sale of the ICO that fuels the BeepBeep Nation app is already available. Check out the EMINENT token now!

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The EMINENT token: Your Token to Creating Kindness

Today, it’s almost impossible to imagine a world where progress isn’t defined by how far we’ve come along with technology. It’s simply true that gigantic technological developments such as the Internet and its plethora of facets have given us convenience in ways that previous generations of people have only begun to imagine.

It’s undeniable that in a huge way, the Internet shapes the way our global economies and political landscapes are evolving. However, in small ways, it also shapes how people interact with each other now. Insofar as technology sometimes gets in the way of real face-to-face social interactions, it also has the enormous potential of improving our relationships.

The BeepBeep Nation app wants to utilize that potential in its mission of making the world a better place. By providing a platform to connect a person who needs help (requestor) and a help provider (helper), it promotes and encourages a helping economy. With this, every kind of help is always just one beep away. Simply put, the app offers the means towards sharing our lives to others and creating kindness in the world.

And how do we get started? A token especially made to fuel the BeepBeep Nation app will be launched soon, and it will be our token to creating kindness and experiencing human interaction on a whole new level of warmth. The EMINENT (EMN) token will be used by requestors to pay for their help requests called Beeps or to give Gratitude Tips to their helpers, though the latter is not required. After all, the goal is to build this helping economy on the willingness of people to help out.

Cashless, seamless, and convenient for users, the EMINENT (EMN) token fuels the BeepBeep Nation app and enables people to be more compassionate in a truly efficient and effective way. With just the push of a button, you can easily ask for help from people nearby or easily offer help to those who need it. By constantly giving people opportunities to help out,  wherever they may be and whatever kind of help is needed, the EMINENT token will ultimately fuel a culture of kindness. By joining the mission of creating kindness in the world, people will be able to lead more fulfilled, meaningful lives.

The word”EMINENT,” if used in the context of a person, means “respected”; and as an attribute of a person, it represents a positive quality that is noticeable. EMINENT is what BeepBeep Nation users should aspire to be when they use the app. And it might only take a little effort to get going on creating kindness and being eminent, yet the results might be huge. After all, through the EMINENT token and the BeepBeep Nation app, we could see a future where kindness is shared everyday, human-to-human. A future where the world functions on both technology and compassion.

I’m sure all of us have reasons to help people in need. They might include these: being able to make new friends or business contacts, getting to have a truly engaging conversation with someone, feeling good about doing something good, and most importantly, participating in an inspiring mission of planting seeds of compassion in the world. So don’t be afraid to contribute to this helping economy soon, for yourself and for others.

Creating kindness through the EMINENT (EMN) token is not only convenient, it might just make big waves of change. Truly, with just one Beep, you could make the world a better place. ICO coming soon!

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Difficult Conversations You Need To Have With Your Significant Other

How many kids to have, whether or not to share a bank account, and where to host a dream wedding don’t make first-date conversations. In fact, you may end up with a runaway date and dinner bill all to yourself. But somewhere along the road, they become increasingly relevant, especially when long-term partnership is in the books.

Whether you have been together for a year or five, these are the conversations you definitely need to have with your significant other.

Once a relationship has been defined (or DTR’d, for millennial readers), it is crucial to lay down your expectations of one another. Are you a private person? And if so, how much of your relationship are you willing to openly share on social media? While it is not uncommon to experience the occasional bout of insecurity, do you expect your partner to provide you with updates throughout the day? Whatever the case, it is important to express your expectations, within reasonable limits.

The popular saying, “opposites attract” is the case for some couples. However, it isn’t always fun and games when your notions and ideas clash. Beliefs are a vital area of discussion, especially if you hail from two polarizing backgrounds. If you are a devout animal rights activist, can you stomach a partner who loves steak and frites? Appreciating the politics of another is something that is naturally realized between two people–but couples exist on a different level of intimacy, which is not always as simple as it seems.

It remains inevitable for a couple to engage in the periodic argument. Perhaps he had forgotten to do the groceries or she forgot to let the dog out to do his business. Regardless, a means of communication must be established. Are you the type who is confrontational? Do you need time to gather your thoughts before discussing the issue at hand? Your partner must eventually familiarize themselves with your habits–how you get a point across. Addressing how your partner thinks he or she can best handle a difficult situation may not be the most comfortable discussion (in fact, we know it isn’t). Instead, recall a particular argument you may have had and analyze how your significant other handled the situation.

Meeting a serious partner’s family is always a formidable moment. While it may be intimidating, it is also exciting and something that should be discussed beforehand. Talking about your family relationships is a topic that shouldn’t be avoided. Your mother may prefer quiet brunches on Sundays while his or hers may be boisterous and all about nightlife. Find common ground–an activity both parties can appreciate. Know how to approach your partner’s relatives. Maybe they are soft-spoken. Maybe they are loud. Nevertheless, it isn’t about being impressive. It’s about demonstrating your best qualities and showing nothing but respect.

Talks about the future may be fun and casual, but this will not always be the case. Together with your partner, enumerate your goals as a couple. What do you foresee when the honeymoon phase comes to an end? Do you plan to live in the city or perhaps somewhere more remote? Agree to compromise when you can’t completely see eye-to-eye.

 

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