Twitter Backfire Raises Thousands For Girls’ Education In Africa

September alone has seen many successful fundraisers. In a month, a deaf boy raised $15,000 for deaf children in need. Similarly, a group of El Segundo cops raised $5,000 for a student robbed of her college fund. Students at the Craigburn Primary School in South Australia raised a whopping $200,000 to educate girls in Africa — thanks to an unanticipated Twitter backfire.

Senator Bernardi tweeted his frustration about the idea on Wednesday by writing, “This gender morphing is really getting absurd.”

The campaign, known as Do It In A Dress, encourages students of all genders to sport dresses for the sake of awareness. Australian charity OneGirl has been running the project for six years, schooling others on the lack of education for African girls. Despite the backlash, Bernardi, whose tweet prompted a frenzy of donations, stands by his opinion.

“I think, and many parents think, that it’s completely inappropriate for a school to encourage their male teachers and male students to wear drag at a casual clothes day,”

Ru Paul ought to give Bernardi a lesson in empowerment. OneGirl executive Morgan Koegel expressed her surprise over the positive response of benefactors. The tight-knit Australian fundraising community is proof that anyone can do good — no matter what the attire.

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The Hope in Social Apps Amidst Global Challenges

Right now, some people would say the world we live in is a dark, dark place. There is, of course, some truth to that. All around us, there are stories of conflict, of suffering, of endless global crises. But it doesn’t have to stay that way. There might be problems we cannot ever address because they need entire organizations and nations to solve, but even as ordinary humans we can do our fair share of alleviating the hardships of others.

One thing that has consistently helped us is the advent of technology. Again, some would say that our constant drive for innovations and scientific advancements are actually urging us to veer away from our humanity and from each other, but certain developments prove otherwise. Some argue that technology can even make us more human. And I agree, especially when it comes to social apps and how they have facilitated empathy between people. Despite the many problems that people around the world are facing, some glimmer of hope arises in social apps and how they bring people closer to each other and thus closer to solving their crises. Here are some ways that social apps nurture hope:

1. Speaking out and raising awareness

More and more, social apps are being used to promote awareness and share vital information. Some people are simply not as exposed to important issues, and they truly benefit from others who speak out in order to help them understand. For instance, a mother posted some facts plus her own take on depression on Facebook, an inspiring post that has gone viral and helped break stigmatizing opinions on the matter. Mental health is a serious problem because it is not yet as accepted by many people despite the scientific data, so it always helps to bring stuff like it to the limelight and get the conversation going. It is always so tear-jerking when you hear (or read?) someone speak so passionately about something so significant.

Since it spans networks and networks of people, social media could definitely be a good avenue to raise awareness. Ordinary individuals can participate in the global discussion, even if it means starting to inform and converse with the people who are closer to them.

2. Crowdfunding

One of my favorite online trends ever is GoFundMe. It helped a deaf boy provide hearing aids to fellow deaf children. It helped cops replace the stolen college tuition money of a deserving student. It helped students fund the surgery of their teacher’s wife.

Fundraising initiatives have probably been going around since time immemorial, but technology has certainly taken it to a whole new level. Crowdfunding is an interesting online trend because you are not only appealing to people you know inside your own community, you are inviting people from everywhere to share your cause. In doing so, you get to witness empathy on a global scale. It proves that we don’t have to be so similar, we can speak different languages and live in different countries, and still have the heart to help each other.

3. Doing little acts of kindness

Lastly, just because we can raise awareness virtually or donate money online, doesn’t mean help is limited nowadays to digital forms. Tweets, Facebook posts, and even blogs that talk about important issues are definitely a good way to participate in changing the world. Crowdsourcing is another surefire way to help people out and make an impact in their lives, even if they are far away. But again, help that comes from progressive technology doesn’t necessarily have to remain online or virtual.

The BeepBeep Nation app has a proposal to digitally facilitate connections but encourage face-to-face interactions between people who are willing to help each other out. By linking people who need help and people who can provide it, regardless of how seemingly simple and small the favor is, BeepBeep Nation inspires us to take a step forward and initiate a culture of helping amongst ourselves. It is also a true community app, as it seeks to build networks of peers among people who willingly share their kindness with one another.

It may not seem like a lot to give someone a ride home or a place to stay, or even offer your own recommendation to promote your favorite restaurant in the vicinity, but it’s a start. The world could be a dark place, but there are an infinite number of ways to share the light, if only little by little.

If you think there’s hope in social apps like I do, and want to share your own little spark, be sure to check out the BeepBeep Nation app. Soon to launch worldwide in selected cities, it is fuelled by the EMINENT (EMN) token, now available for sale. Get started now and participate in a world of technological progress, hope and kindness.

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Cultivating Kindness in the Next Generation

Everybody needs a shot of good news everyday. As for me, my dosage of inspiration usually comes from stories involving children who do fantastic, exceptionally kind things for other people, or other people who do fantastic, exceptionally kind things for children. In this blog, it’s no secret that I am partial to featuring the little people of the next generation who’ve shown some really impressive abilities, such as a great deal of empathy.

Some children first understand the need to help others because of their own plight. For instance, a deaf boy started his own fundraising initiative to provide hearing aids for his fellow deaf children. Others are inspired by their loved ones, like this high schooler who invented an AI system to diagnose her grandfather’s eye disease. It goes to show that at an early age, children already have a deep enough understanding of love and already think of the welfare of those around them.

But it doesn’t stop there either. Some children can even empathize with those who live way beyond their backyards and come from backgrounds way different from theirs. At times of disasters, for instance, children show that they feel so much for people that are suffering, as exemplified by an 8-year-old who collected over a thousand toys that he eventually gave away to Puerto Rican kids after the terrible hurricane. Unfortunately, some adults aren’t even able to have this kind of empathy, but some kids definitely do.

Meanwhile, some preschoolers just want to have fun and eventually end up helping others out, like this prodigious 5-year-old who sells her own astounding galaxy paintings and donates the proceeds to a charity.

But what do these stories of the next generation mean for us who come before them? Should we feel bad and envious that they are already doing so much more? Should our generation take credit for raising such beautiful children? No, though perhaps possible, none of those seems right.

Some groups of people have already figured out what to do and what their role is. Educational institutions in New York have been trying to address the problem of inequality by providing free lunches to kids of lower status, while libraries in Los Angeles have waived book rental fees for readers under the age of 21. This Massachusetts startup is making life better for kids with autism by providing smart glasses that can help them track emotion and improve their social skills. Disney itself committed 100 million dollars to children’s hospitals.

That’s right. What we need to do for the next generation is show them that they can become the best versions of themselves, because this world is going to be kind to them. And we have to make sure that it happens. We absolutely have to make this world a better place for the people who will succeed us, so that they may continue on the good work.

Not all of us can donate millions of dollars or invent something incredibly beneficial. But there are things we can do, like volunteer our time and skills to organizations dedicated to the welfare of children, mentor kids in our community who show interest in the fields we know about, support and participate in school and after-school programs, and many others. Sometimes, even showing compassion to tiny members of the family like our own children or nephews and nieces might already be enough.

In the end, it’s all about the culture of kindness that we cultivate for them, so that when the time comes for them to take charge of the world, they can take things further and make it an even better place. We have to inculcate kindness in them, so that they can pay it forward and be even kinder to others. No doubt, cultivating kindness in the next generation means that we ourselves have to be kind to each other. As they say, lead by example.

One such app with the same mission is BeepBeep Nation. It aims to make the world a better place by connecting people who need help and others who can offer it. Providing a plethora of opportunities to give back and help out, it enables people to exercise compassion the way they want to. Ultimately, BeepBeep Nation encourages people to share their lives with one another and believe in a future built on kindness. This is exactly the kind of mindset that our children should learn as they are growing up.

Fuelled by the EMINENT token, the BeepBeep Nation app is set to launch soon, in selected cities worldwide. Pre-sale of the token is already live, with some bonuses available. Check out the ICO now! It’s never too early for children to find the heart to help out, and it’s never too late for us to encourage them to do so.

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Officer Donates Motorized Recliner To War Veteran

Despite their heroism, veterans of war don’t always retire comfortably. But for a select few, luck was just around the corner. While some were able to kickstart their careers with a hefty donation, others received a hero’s burial. For senior vet Ron Barwick, help was walking along the street — and donating a brand-new recliner.

“I posted something on Facebook, just to some family and friends at like 5 in the morning on Monday, and within an hour, 6:00 we had over a dozen people that had stood up and responded to the needs of a fellow man,” said Officer [Jordan] Gaiche.

In a speedy 36 hours, Gaiche had raised enough money to purchase Barwick a new motorized recliner. For the Vietnam warhorse, it was a treat, as back problems made beds a lingering nightmare.

“I think the real heroes are a man that served his country, a neighbor, I think that neighbor’s a hero. And 21 people that gave money I think they’re the heroes in this,” said Officer Gaiche.

Some may look more like heroes than others — but the job is totally up for grabs, no matter who you are.

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Community Helps Repair Beekeeping Equipment

With bee populations at risk, moves to ban pesticides and upgrade beekeeping technology are on the rise. Still, in spite of such grand efforts, trouble loomed over Wild Hill Honey. Vandals ransacked the business of $50,000 in damage, unrecoverable — at least until the community stepped in.

“Some vandals came up and they destroyed all of our beehives and most of our beekeeping equipment. They tried to batter their way into our shed but eventually they piled some stuff up and went in through the window,” says [owner Justin] Engelhardt.

Legally, bees can’t be insured, and repairs are covered by personal expenses. But, in just a few days, neighbors raised $35,000 for the Engelhardts — over half of what was needed. Even better, police easily secured a lead.

“The police response was fantastic. We called and they came right away and they dusted for fingerprints at the shed, and there are some footprints that they’re using to try to further the investigation and hopefully that leads somewhere,” says Engelhardt.

Thanks to the donors, Wild Hill Honey will resume operations in the spring. A buzzing little heart sure does go a long way!

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Little Boy Holds Toy Drive For Kids In Puerto Rico

Puerto Rico’s recovery has been slow-moving, but the outpouring of helping hands has remained on the rise. Donors across the globe are raffling items for funds and pledging hoarded supplies to get people on their feet. While the devastated country is slipping from headlines, some, like Jayden Perez, refuse to give up. To help Puerto Rican kids, the 8-year-old is collecting toys, and has scored over a thousand in just two weeks.

Kids lost a lot of their toys, and now they don’t have any,” Jayden tells the camera [in a Facebook post]. “So can you donate one toy, from the bottom of my heart and the bottom of your heart?”

According to Perez’s mother Ana Rosado, the family has also raised a sum of more than $6,000. Describing the selfless act as holiday cheer may now be an understatement.

“I think it’s a great experience for Jayden to see what these kids have gone through and the smile that he’s going to bring to them when he gives them the toys,” Rosado said.

The family will venture out onto the island to personally distribute the toys.  Santa better watch out — there’s a new one in town!

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Woman Raises $227,000 For Homeless Samaritan

It isn’t everyday that people pay it forward to strangers. But in times of desperate need, you can count on dentists to work free and hoarders to donate supplies. You can meet a good samaritan anywhere, just as Kate McClure met Johnny Bobbitt Jr. The homeless veteran spent his last $20 on a gas refill after McClure’s car broke down on Interstate 95. To repay him, McClure raised over $227,000 in just under two weeks.

“I wish that I could do more for this selfless man, who went out of his way just to help me that day,” [McClure] wrote on the fundraising page.

With Philadelphia nearing the winter season, McClure made several trips down to the interstate to bring Bobbitt supplies. Determined to get the 34-year-old veteran back on his feed, she started a GoFundMe page, to which over 7,600 people have already contributed.

“[I] truly believe that all Johnny needs is one little break. Hopefully with your help I can be the one to give it to him.”

With more than $110,000 donated on Thanksgiving alone, the holidays couldn’t be more festive.

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Girl Raises $1,500 For Charity With Thanksgiving Boxes

When you’re an Eagles defender or Bill Gates, giving back to the community is an easy job to sustain. For others, simpler lifestyles don’t always allow sizable donations. Still, 7-year-old Alex Fischer, determined to help feed the homeless, raised $1,500 by selling Thanksgiving boxes.

“I just thought it would be nice to do Thanksgiving food boxes for people in need. I want other people to have a happy Thanksgiving.” [said Fischer.]

To raise a goal of $150, the Fischer family threw together goodie bags filled with canned goods and stuffing. Besides door-to-door selling, Fischer opted to put up a lemonade stand. Impressed by their daughter, parents James and Lisa called for donations online.

“Your donation is twofold; you’ll be helping a family enjoy a homemade Thanksgiving meal together and also helping Alex learn the joy of helping others in her community.” [wrote Fischer’s parents.]

The whopping $1,500 will feed 100 families, while any remainder will go to the Charlotte Rescue Mission. Looks like Fischer is truly in for some holiday cheer!

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Football Fan Raffles Jersey To Donate To Puerto Rico

I believe it’s in every child’s nature to want to help others. Media may be an issue, but for the most part, kids seem inherently willing to put others first. It’s youngsters who raise funds for deaf children and go out of their way to help drowning swimmers that confirm my beliefs. Seven-year-old Alex Ibarra is another commendable adolescent. The avid football fan auctioned a jersey signed by Christian Pulisic in order to raise funds for Puerto Rico.

“I’m raffling it off because I’m trying to raise money for the Puerto Ricans that don’t have food and water,” Alex said. “Puerto Rico’s really important to me because they’re one of our territories.”

With much of the country void of power, food, and water, the donation will do wonders. Altogether, Alex and the American Outlaws (Oakland) raised $3,283.87 to contribute to the Hispanic Federation UNIDOS Disaster Relief Fund.

With Alex’s generosity going viral, Pulisic himself promised to send another signed jersey and pledged a donation as well. For a kid whose age hasn’t yet hit double-digits, I’d say Alex is doing pretty well.

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Deaf Boy Raises Money For Deaf Children

When it comes to being charitable, it’s never to early to start. In fact, some benefactors can be as young as 5-years-old, like prodigy painter Cassie Gee. For this 10-year-old deaf boy, what started as a lesson in responsibility became a fundraising initiative for other deaf children.

“When my dog ate my hearing aids, I kind of learned how important it is and I kind of felt bad for the other people who might [not be able to replace theirs],” [said] Braden Baker.

Baker lost his hearing aids to family dog Chewy twice, and has since been more diligent in keeping them safe. The troublesome encounter encouraged him to set up a GoFundMe page, which raised $15,000 in a single month. Baker donated the money to Oticon Hearing Foundation.

“We could not be more thankful for his generosity and determination,” the foundation, who’s mission is to improve hearing care worldwide, said on their official Facebook page.

Because of kids like Baker, the fact that our future lies in the hands of the new generation isn’t such a scary thought.

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