BeepBeep Nation and Your Dynamic Beep Network of Helpers

Soon to launch is BeepBeep Nation — an app that will offer opportunities for people to request whatever kind of help and others to respond to them. You can get a ride home, read restaurant recommendations, even have a tour guide with just one beep. But what’s underneath this seemingly common service of BeepBeep Nation is a greater mission.

It aims to make the world a better place by fostering a culture of kindness and encouraging face-to-face interaction. By helping others, you get to broaden your circle of peers, build a stronger business network, or even just have nonchalant but interesting conversations every now and then.

As a true social app, BeepBeep Nation requires both requestors and helpers to meet in person when resolving a problem.  Social media has inadvertently made human relationships take a colder, digital turn. Even though it still very much utilizes digital technology, the BeepBeep Nation app harnesses that in order to promote more profound social interactions again. But how exactly does it do that?

Of course, as a social app, the BeepBeep Nation app also has its own way of building an individual’s network for him. However, unlike Facebook or Twitter, it does not ask you to make people your “friends” or “followers.” What it does is provide you with a bigger pool of potential requestors and helpers (i.e. potential peers and business contacts) through its very own Dynamic Beep Network of Helpers (DBN). By not offering the same “friends,” “followers,” or “connections” mechanics, it actually provides its users a more dynamic alternative.

Everyone — yes, everyone! — within a 1-5 mile radius of wherever you are is included in your network. All people need to do is install the BeepBeep Nation app on their smartphones, and they’re good to go. No need for “friend” or “follower” requests. Everyone is that easy to reach.

Another interesting thing about your Dynamic Beep Network Of Helpers (DBN) is that it can be composed of different people every time. Say you are travelling from your hometown of Vancouver to attend a conference in Toronto. Your DBN will change so that you have a different pool of potential acquaintances in Toronto from your DBN in Vancouver. Of course, so that people nearby can help you with your needs or you can help people nearby with theirs, the BeepBeep Nation app will connect you to people in the location you yourself specify at any given time. Amazing.

What’s even more amazing is this implication: a constantly changing DBN means having an endless number of opportunities to get help and give help. Having a previously established or curated network of “friends” and “followers” could set your limits — not just with the help you might acquire, but also the potential peers you may still want to get to know. For instance, you only look for people you want to meet in your own circles; you then scan their profiles if you have mutuals. But your DBN always provides you with new possibilities.

After all, BeepBeep Nation’s mission to make the world a better place starts with an individual helping another person out and getting to know him face-to-face. Its feature of giving users a Dynamic Beep Network Of Helpers (DBN) sincerely embodies that mission. If you’re interested in participating and creating a world of kindness, soon to launch is the BeepBeep Nation app. Its fuel, the EMINENT (EMN) token, is already available for sale. Check it out now!

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The Future of Selfies: Wefies and Beepies!

Almost everyone in the world probably knows what selfies are. In the period between 2015 to 2016, around 24 billion selfies have been posted on the Internet, according to Google’s servers. 24 billion! Sounds unbelievable, right? Even though we get to see our friends’ faces each day on social media — as they cook breakfast, walk their dog, sip a latte, try their hand at yoga, host a baby shower, dress up for a fancy date, dress in sweaters and a comfy hoodie, go to the bathroom, stay in bed, and every other human thing to do, really —  I’m sure it’s still an astounding fact.

The activity of taking a selfie sometimes strikes other people who dislike it as vain and unnecessary. However, history says it has long been a human fascination to look at and have oneself immortalized. Supposedly, the first photographic self-portrait ever has been taken in the 19th century by a chemist and photography enthusiast named Robert Cornelius. And long before that, hundreds and hundreds of people have already had themselves painted by artists or even by themselves throughout the centuries. Just visit an art museum, and you’ll quickly realize we are not so different from many generations before us.

Of course, the function of selfies has already evolved, especially now that we live in the digital era. Some people take selfies so that they can keep their friends updated, maybe about a significant event in their lives or just any usual day, like one that says “good morning” in the caption. Some do it to boost their confidence, especially as they have control over how they appear in the image that they’re going to show the world; they can make sure they look good so that they can feel good. Others do it to remember a moment with their family or friends, whether they’re just hanging out on a regular Saturday afternoon or meeting up for the first time in five years.

There are many reasons to take selfies, but I guess one thing that’s common among them is that they all have to do with memories. As humans, we have an urge to preserve our memories so that we can look back on them any time we want. We want a memory of that time we looked so poised, graceful and ready to take on the world with a little black dress. We want a memory of that time we finished a great hike. We want a memory of that time we made funny faces with our cute nephews. We already know this as we make our online presence felt. But I wonder, is this all there is to selfies? What other purpose could it have?

BeepBeep Nation is an app that seeks to create a more meaningful world by enhancing face-to-face human interaction, albeit facilitating it digitally. It provides a platform for people who need help to seek it among others and then other people to reach out and offer a hand. Aside from enabling people to exercise kindness, it also encourages them to broaden their network of peers and share their lives with more people.

Amazingly, the BeepBeep Nation app has an answer to my question about the future of selfies: wefies and Beepies. The term “wefie” has already been used to refer to a selfie taken with a group of people. Meanwhile, a Beepie is a group picture taken through the BeepBeep Nation app between people who request for help (requestors) and people who provided the help (helpers) during their friendly meetup. By simply clicking on the camera icon in the app, you can easily initiate the process of taking a Beepie with your requestor or helper.

Through the Beepie, BeepBeep Nation redefines what selfies could be in the world of kindness that it seeks to create.

Not only can this feature ensure your personal safety when meeting someone unfamiliar through the app and thus build trust in the BeepBeep Nation community, it can also serve the usual functions of a selfie, but better. Because what greater moment to preserve in our memories than when we choose to help others and share our kindness with them? We never know, we might end up creating a good and lasting friendship with our requestor or helper, and your Beepie will always be a significant first in your relationship. Exciting, I know.

If you’re ready to take on the challenge of sharing your kindness, making the world a better place, and creating exciting friendships (plus taking fantastic selfies with your new friends!), the BeepBeep Nation app is set to launch soon. Its fuel, the EMINENT token, is now available for sale! To get started on BeepBeep Nation, make sure to check it out now.

 

 

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Helpers, Requestors, and Spontaneous Friendships

In a world where we’d rather send links to interesting articles and random memes to our friends, pester them in our chatboxes, and click the “Like” button on their vacation photos, it’s hard to remember what the old times were like. Even though we still meet up every now and then with friends for coffee or cocktails and catching up on each other’s lives, one thing I do miss is experiencing spontaneous friendships.

I know part of adult friendships is really just exerting small efforts to maintain your high school or college peers, or perhaps revelling in your co-workers’ company for Friday nights. Meeting new friends is almost out of the question. (The only new people we let into our lives are mostly new business affiliates. At least that’s what happens with me.) But I can’t help but wax nostalgic about the times when you would randomly talk to someone, discover that they’re super interesting and that you jive so well, and then exchange contact details. Where are those circumstances now?

I mean, I’m aware that online friendships are not so bad. I see my teenage niece and nephew spend hours on Twitter and I wouldn’t berate them for it. They get the online social life that they need. But I can’t help but ask if they ever wonder about some kind of bonding other than their friends tweeting about their dog or Snapchatting their sandwiches. Do they even go to sneaky house parties nowadays? Kidding. But on a more serious note, I think technology brings people closer together, but it also maintains this distance between people somehow.

That’s why the BeepBeep Nation app is an amazing project to look forward to. Not only does it offer a platform for people to request for the specific kind of help they need — like perhaps sharing a ride or having a tour guide — and then for other people near the area to respond, it does so with an exciting motive in mind. Let’s see what the creators have to say:

[We’re returning] our users to the days when being social means actually meeting up in person and talking to each other face to face, instead of doing it mainly through the screen of a smartphone and hardly ever seeing each other.

[I]n what appears to be a paradox, we’re using cold technology itself to enhance warm human values and human interaction in ways that are far removed from the technology itself.

The people who beep when they need something are called requestors, while the people who provide help are called helpers. BeepBeep nation aims to foster dynamic and spontaneous friendships between requestors and helpers, as everytime a need arises, so does the opportunity to get to know someone new. At the end of the day, not only do you get the help you need or feel good for helping, you just might create new and exciting friendships.

So here’s to prospective requestors: don’t be afraid. Your hands might be full to do a particular thing, so look for an extra hand. It’s actually a sign of maturity to realize you can’t do everything alone. Seek help and if you want, you can give your helper a gratitude tip, you can simply say thanks, or maybe keep in touch. Not only can asking for help make you feel human, it will also show your interest in other humans who can be there for you.

And here’s to prospective helpers: it doesn’t have to be a big effort to help out. Sometimes, you may not even have to go out of your way. Shopping for a requestor’s item at a store you’re going to anyway doesn’t cost any extra time, right? Not only can doing a little kindness make you feel good, you can also inspire the person you’re helping to pay the kindness forward. And what’s a tiny favor in exchange for possibly great, spontaneous friendships?

And of course, while the guarantee of friendship still depends on the people involved, at the very least requestors and helpers could have a random, engaging conversation for the day. What’s not to love about that?

To get started on BeepBeep Nation, find out more about the EMINENT token a.k.a. fuel for the amazing app. Coming soon in selected cities worldwide!

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Therapy Dogs Are Not Just For Humans – Cheetahs Need Them Too!

Dog is man’s best friend for many legitimate reasons. They are eyes for the blind and companions for the suffering. We have turned to dogs for comfort in the face of hard times and now, cheetahs at the Richmond Zoo need them too.

Kumbali is a cheetah cub at the Metro Richmond Zoo, and as a newborn, the cub was losing weight because its mother wasn’t producing enough milk to feed her litter. Once Kumbali was cared for and brought back to health, his family rejected him, but the anxious cat, very social by nature, still needed a friend. That’s where Kago, a companion dog, came in.

Dogs–and Labrador Retrievers in particular–are calming by nature, but also extremely confident. Kumbali takes behavioral cues from Kago, and while Kago is the dominant protector, Kumbali is not intimidated and will not cause his friend any harm.

This symbiotic relationship would never happen in the wild; however, we believe the positive outcomes outweigh any negative. As the two grow up together, they create a bond that becomes almost inseparable, sibling-like.

Kumbali and Kago’s story screams “Real Life Fox And The Hound” and I’m all for it!

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