Millennials are Intensely Changing the Food Industry — Here’s How

 

As the old saying goes, change is the only constant thing in the world. And with a politically engaged and environmentally concerned generation, that should ring very true. Say what you will about millennials — I’m sure opinions vary about the traits that characterize the generation — but they sure bring forth some important changes. Most succinctly, to the food industry.

Millennials are dramatically disrupting the way food is produced, packaged, marketed and served. As a highly vocal group, millennials have given food producers little option but to listen to their demands, resulting in changes to not only food choices, but farming techniques and restaurant services as well.

Though it seems obvious and simple that individual food choices are changing across generations, surely there are bound to be implications on the entire food industry. One of the significant changes on the food landscape is how the word healthy is understood.

While older generations may have contented themselves with vague “low-fat” or “healthy” labels, millennials have higher expectations, especially when it comes to GMOs.

Not only are they exploring healthy Mediterranean diets or looking for meat alternatives, people now have also been advocating for healthier food production techniques. A good nutritional breakdown isn’t enough anymore, this generation wants their food sources organic.

And because of this, healthy has also started to mean local.

[This] has led to a preference for local food brands over national ones, both at the level of production and consumption. Whether buying food at the grocery store or eating out, millennials seek out locally sourced food . . . Some millennials have taken this trend a step further and started to grow their own food in urban and rooftop farms.

True enough, these days, interesting options exist for people who want to try their own hand at producing their own food. Home gardening systems such as OGarden and TerraFarms are now available in the market. So, in addition to being healthy and locally sourced, alternative food sources that millennials encourage are also sustainable.

Another important change in the food industry is the increase popularity of eating out in restaurants.

Technology also plays a major role in making restaurants more popular with younger generations. With apps like the Humane Eating project that combine millennials’ love of technology with sustainable eating, it’s no wonder that more people are exploring new places to eat.

So, to recap, some preferences that millennials have shown the food industry are these: healthy, locally sourced, and sustainably grown. And with how technology and social media work nowadays, it’s no wonder that these choices became demands that the food industry have had to respond to. As a result, more and more huge companies such as Dunkin Donuts’, McDonald’s, and other food giants have been committing to efforts toward sustainability.

It’s only a matter of time before we see how these changes in the food industry will eventually affect other sectors like public health and even the global economy. But it’s amazing to see how individual food choices have led up to this moment. So millennials, don’t be afraid to be bold. Even with your choice of salad for brunch tomorrow.

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42 Food Giants Pledge to Ax Plastic

2018 gave us a lot of eco-friendly changes in the food industry: Pepsi debuted reusable bottles for flavored beverages, Dunkin Donuts ditched foam cups from their packaging, even McDonald’s followed suit with foam cups and plastic straws. I hate to say that this environmentalist trend among food giants has reached its peak with the good news I bring now, but it does feel like a culmination of sorts.

A total of 42 food companies in the UK — composed of retailers, supermarkets, manufacturers, and brands — have pledged to ax single-use plastics by 2025.

Together, the signatories represent roughly 80% of the plastics sold in UK supermarkets. The initiative . . . has set a series of goals to cut wasteful packaging over the course of the next seven years. For starters, the initiative will ensure that 100% of plastic packaging must either be recyclable, compostable, or reusable in order to make it onto supermarket shelves. Some supermarkets have gone even further and declared that plastic packaging will no longer be used on fruits and vegetables.

The signatories include UK brands like Asda, Nestle, Lidl, Coca-Cola, Aldi, PepsiCo, Unilever, Tesco, Waitrose, Morrisons, Sainsbury, and many others. Besides ensuring the elimination of single-use plastics, the pledge also covers recycling. The current recycling rate is 30%, and the participating food giants seek to bump it up to 70%.

Environment Secretary Michael Gove, who is backing the pact, said in a statement: “Our ambition to eliminate avoidable plastic waste will only be realized if government, businesses, and the public work together.”

In addition to bringing super chic eco-bags to the supermarket, well, I guess I just have to remember this pledge to feel less guilty when buying those apples.

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