Car Rental Group Donates $30 Million To Save Rivers

We may not yet be seeing an end to a number of global long-term issues, but many have since come forward to help. To shoulder educational expenses for underprivileged children, NFL stud Chris Long is playing an entire season for free. On the other side of the spectrum, Petsmart is donating millions of meals to shelter animals. Now tackling the urgent matter of resource depletion is Rent-A-Car, which is pledging $30 million to river conservation.

There are four main parts to this new project, which is known as the “Routes & Roots: Enterprise Healthy Rivers Project.” It is targeting rivers in Mississippi, Colorado, Canada, and Europe.

Rent-A-Car (Enterprise) will be dealing primarily with nutrient runoff and watershed restoration, while working closely with farmers and ranchers. The project is ambitious, but will likely remain afloat thanks to its healthy budget. Granddaughter of Enterprise founder Jack Taylor is optimistic about their vision.

“Our philanthropic focus … reaches beyond to make a difference and improve the quality of life wherever our employees and customers live and work,” noted Carolyn Kindle Betz.

Looks like Enterprise isn’t just about its cars!

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Sustainable Ceremonies Top Wedding Trends

When it comes to weddings, it’s all about the bride and groom. No matter the price tag, food and decor are all up to the lovebirds. However, receptions can be wasteful, and newlyweds are starting to do something about it. For one British couple, it was all about serving up a zero-waste feast. But sustainable ceremonies aren’t the easiest to pull off — at least not without the help of Day Maker Events.

“Many ask for a green wedding these days. People show concern over the use of plastics and other non-biodegradable materials for the decorations. So, we thought why not go back to the past and our valuable traditions!”

To start a new age of wedding trends, the Kochi company in India provides a slew of charming decorations made entirely of coconut products. From grand arches to leaf plates, Day Maker Events knows how to keep it green. And definitely pretty.

“It is environment-friendly and it benefits farmers, too… Above all, the cost is very less compared to other types of decorations. Disposal after use will also not be an issue.”

The best part? Hiring them won’t cost you over a thousand bucks. Interestingly rustic, it shows us one thing: sustainability can come with style!

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Saltwater Grown Rice Can Feed Millions

Thanks to over-harvesting, over-fishing, and overdoing pretty much everything, alternative food sources are all the rage. In the near future, the dory in your fish taco could be lab-grown. Your oatmeal may even be 100% renewable. And, if Chinese scientists prove it a success, rice will flourish in saltwater and create enough food for 200 million people.

The rice was grown in a field near the Yellow Sea coastal city of Qingdao in China’s eastern Shandong province. 200 different types of the grain were planted to investigate which would grow best in salty conditions.

Per hectare, scientists predicted an output of 4.5 tons. Much to their surprise, and because nature is cooler than we think, the yield hit 9.3 tons. With 1 million square kilometers of previously unused high-saline land now on the market, rice production could rise by 20%.

“If a farmer tries to grow some types of saline-tolerant rice now, they most likely will get 1,500 kilograms per hectare. That is just not profitable and not even worth the effort.” [says team leader Yuan Longping.]

A kilogram of the stuff goes for around $8, a whopping eight times more costly than regular rice. Still, some six tons have already made their way into kitchens. Beyond everything, the price is rice!

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Locals Rescue Animals From Mount Agung Eruption

In the midst of a disaster, there are always appropriate methods of reaching out to victims. What we sometimes appear to forget is that animals are part of the demographic. That doesn’t seem to be the case for Bali locals, who are frantically relocating cows and monkeys away from an active volcano.

Mount Agung, about 75km from the resort hub of Kuta, has been shaking since August, causing 144,000 people to evacuate their homes over the past week as experts warn an eruption could be imminent.

The volcano has since triggered hundreds of earthquakes by the hour. The Jakarta Animal Aid Network has deployed a 12-man team to carry out the dangerous rescue mission. While a dozen people may seem futile, I’ve got to hand it to them for hiking some 12 km for pigs and chickens.

“Emotionally, it’s really hard for the farmers to part with their cattle, not only for economic reasons but also they care so much about the animals. Some insisted they stay in their village with their livestock even though their safety in is danger.”

Some livestock farmers have opted to sell their animals in an attempt to save them. That’s what I call a whole lot of love for four-legged friends.

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Students Build Bamboo Pavilion For Chinese Farmers

Bamboo as a building material is rising in popularity. Panyaden International School in Thailand hosts a sports hall made entirely of bamboo. Now, students at the University of Hong Kong, along with the craftspeople of Peitian, have created a bamboo pavilion for local farmers.

The shelter’s concept derived from a desire to regenerate the area’s tea houses, which are used as resting spots for farmers working on the surrounding land and to provide shelter from storms in rainy seasons, or from the sun during the hottest part of the day.

The structure pays homage to traditional bamboo weaving, an art form that has seen great decline over the years. While students incorporated digital software to map the structure’s features, locals managed to assimilate traditional techniques.

“Historically, these pavilions were often used by craftsmen to demonstrate their skill or to trial new construction methodologies. Today these structures have, for the most part, been replaced by generic outbuildings in concrete and brick,”

With only one surviving bamboo weaver in Peitian, the pavilion is a valiant attempt to keep Chinese customs alive.

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