Students Build Bamboo Pavilion For Chinese Farmers

Bamboo as a building material is rising in popularity. Panyaden International School in Thailand hosts a sports hall made entirely of bamboo. Now, students at the University of Hong Kong, along with the craftspeople of Peitian, have created a bamboo pavilion for local farmers.

The shelter’s concept derived from a desire to regenerate the area’s tea houses, which are used as resting spots for farmers working on the surrounding land and to provide shelter from storms in rainy seasons, or from the sun during the hottest part of the day.

The structure pays homage to traditional bamboo weaving, an art form that has seen great decline over the years. While students incorporated digital software to map the structure’s features, locals managed to assimilate traditional techniques.

“Historically, these pavilions were often used by craftsmen to demonstrate their skill or to trial new construction methodologies. Today these structures have, for the most part, been replaced by generic outbuildings in concrete and brick,”

With only one surviving bamboo weaver in Peitian, the pavilion is a valiant attempt to keep Chinese customs alive.

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Bamboo Building Can Withstand Natural Disasters

If consumers can go green, so can infrastructure. So far we’ve seen the emergence of vertical gardens and power-generating houses. Now the trend is hitting schools across the globe. This bamboo building in Panyaden International School in Thailand doesn’t only have a zero-carbon footprint — it can also withstand natural disasters.

Designed by Chiangmai Life Construction, the Bamboo Sports Hall features a modern organic design that draws inspiration from the lotus flower. The large multipurpose facility was built to withstand local natural forces including high-speed winds and earthquakes, and it boasts a zero-carbon footprint.

The facility is huge, to say the least, at 782 square meters large. It is modeled after a lotus, in honor of the school’s Buddhist values. It can accommodate up to 300 students and includes varying sports provisions.

“The bamboo used absorbed carbon to a much higher extent than the carbon emitted during treatment, transport and construction.”

The use of bamboo partners well with Panyaden’s “Green School” mission. The material has a lifespan of at least 50 years.

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Cook Up A Meal With This Biodegradable Grill

Over the past year, we’ve seen recycling at its best, using old materials to create unexpected products. From backpacks made of car parts to trash packaging, many resources are proving that they can be useful even after expiring. This biodegradable grill is no exception. The CasusGrill is a one-use product — and you can toss it anywhere.

The grill is made from all natural materials that readily biodegrade… Its outer body is recycled cardboard. A layer of natural rocks form an inner shell, which insulate the cardboard from the flames… And then on the very inside, a flat layer of match-lit bamboo charcoal provides a perfectly even layer of heat. The grate above is made from bamboo, too.

The CasusGrill retails for only $8, a steal considering the product burns for around an hour. Comparatively, it decomposes much quicker than a disposable aluminum grill, which takes nearly 400 years to break down.

Those evenly spaced charcoal briquette disks? They’re far more geometrically efficient for distributing heat than dumping charcoal into a container would be. So you can get by with less charcoal.

While it may be costly to regular grillers, the product is definitely worth the buck for something more seasonal.

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