Blind Woman Represents US in International Triathlon

Constantly reading and writing about the kindness and heroism of some people inevitably make me reflect upon their stories. And I’ve noticed an important pattern. First, age doesn’t really matter — a 58-year-old woman can save factory workers from a fire, a 4-year-old girl can donate her tiny allowance to a cancer patient, and a 99-year-old man can even break a world record on swimming. And neither can status hinder people from being kind or heroic — a multi-billion company can surely fund children’s hospitals, but an ordinary ticket agent can save children from human trafficking.

Today’s reflection involves another thing that cannot hinder people from achieving extraordinary things: disability. This is proven by a blind woman from San Diego named Amy Dixon, who will represent the United States in the 2020 Paralympics, to be held in Tokyo. She will be competing in the triathlon.

When Dixon is not working to improve her best personal race time, she is working on improving the lives of those in our community. For the past two years, she has held camps that teaches the visually and audibly impaired how to race in triathlons. Additionally, Dixon has been able to raise enough money each year to provide this camp at no cost to its participants.

Also known as “Super Woman,” Amy Dixon only has 2% of her vision left. But looking at her community work and sports career, this has not left the blind woman helpless. In fact, it seemed to do the opposite, as she has been inspired to accomplish so much, not only in the field of sports.

While working to better the lives of those impaired, she is actively working on saving the sight of others through her work as the Vice President of the Glaucoma Eyes International Foundation . . . Since she is such an inspiration to San Diego, Senator Joel Anderson recently honored Dixon’s efforts by presenting her with a certificate of recognition for her tremendous athletic achievements and her dedication to better the lives of those in our community.

If we cannot let age, status, and disability be significant in performing great deeds and becoming our best selves, then what else matters? I think, if you have time to reflect upon many people’s lives (and I hope you do), then you’ll be quick to answer this. For now, here’s a clue: it starts with an h, ends with a t, and in the middle, has a bodily organ used to listen. To really find the answer, maybe you should listen to your heart. Wink.

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NFL Athlete Anonymously Donates Bone Marrow

Athletes have a long history of charitable acts, donating medals and paychecks to those in need. While most have the means to make monetary pledges, others make more personal contributions. When local Kansas man Roy Coe grew sick with lymphoma, an anonymous NFL player donated bone marrow.

“That was a pretty good day,” he explained. “It was good to know that there was somebody out there.”

Doctors revealed only two years later that Coe’s donor was, in fact, a famous athlete. Though his identity will remain a secret to the public, Coe will soon get to meet his mystery savior.

“He probably saved my life,” Coe explained. “I owe him a big old ‘thank you’ for that.”

Not only did Coe go into remission — he got to witness a once-in-a-lifetime Super Bowl. I guess modern-day fairytales do come true.

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