If You’re Not Natural In A Skill You Can Learn It

Learning a new skill is on everyone’s agenda. Whether it’s becoming fluent in a foreign language or simply having something as an asset, skills are undeniably valuable. While being able to teach yourself something instantly is the Facebook community’s most desired superpower, it isn’t all that easy. However, it’s definitely possible.

Firstly, find a skill you are passionate about. What is something you’ve always wanted to learn to do? Forget difficulty levels for now, and go beyond a “just for fun” mindset. Consider the skill as something that will be vital to your life (and anyway, it may be).

Things may be easier if you consider your own skills. Some activities require good memory retention or an ability to accurately follow instructions. If you can already check certain “pre-requisites” off a list, your chances at becoming an expert at your new skill are significantly higher.

Once you’ve picked your skill, set realistic goals. Figure out what your primary motivation is. Do you want to learn to draw because a university elective requires it? Or do you want to impress a colleague? Whatever the case, make these goals meaningful to you, however shallow they may seem. Your bar should be at a defined level of expertise. If you want to become knowledgeable in a language, are you seeking full comprehension or get-by conversation? Gauge your own strengths and weaknesses in regards to this particular skill.

If you’re training yourself to become proficient in something you’ve never done before, chances are, you want to learn fast. If you can’t, don’t let your pace discourage you. On the ground, sloths move 2 meters a minute. It’s a stretch, but they get the job done. Manage your expectations and also set a deadline. When will this skill be most useful to you? Figure things out far in advance. If your chosen skill is writing fiction and you’re keen on entering a short story contest, don’t hesitate. Dive in!

Break down the skill. If you’re into photography, you’re going to have to learn the ropes of using cameras and editing tools. Skills can be two or even three-fold — making a list of what you have to tackle will come in handy. It’s kind of like throwing together a deconstructed meal. Be visual about it. Build graphs and brain maps (they may sound pretty juvenile, but they are useful — I promise!).

Remember, practice makes perfect. Make it your mantra and remember: consistency is your friend. You can learn a perfect Pachelbel Canon on the piano but fail to retain certain strokes because you don’t practice enough. On that note, don’t overwork yourself. It’s the same principle as studying too hard for an exam. While it’s great for your short-term memory, the stress will tire your mind.

Every now and then, you’ll feel like giving up. “It’s too difficult,” is a phrase that nobody is alien to. Identify your pain points. What do you know you’ll struggle with? If it’s hand-eye coordination or remembering sequences, figure out the best way to overcome these struggles. Most importantly, remember your motivation.

Maybe there is a charm that comes with being a natural at something. However, it doesn’t mean making the effort is any less attractive!

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Senior Professor Schools Teachers On The Art Of Fun

It’s stories about locals risking their lives to save animals from an active volcano or a modest restaurant feeding the poor that restore my faith in humanity. Amidst a slew of tragedies, I became doubtful of the human capacity to do good. I then came across the story of Dr. Richard Overfelt, an 88-year-old professor who helps schoolteachers rediscover their love for educating. And to say I was pleasantly surprised is an understatement.

“We cover teachers up today with statistics, with data, and testing almost every other day,” Overfelt said. And as a result he says “there isn’t enough time and energy to really teach the kids.”

Excellent point. On the first day of classes at Truman State University, senior professor Overfelt dresses in a clown costume. It’s unusual but hilarious, and nothing like Pennywise from Stephen King’s It. Overfelt teaches educators not just to revise their curriculums, but to relate to their students on a personal level. Looking back at my own academic life, I suppose I can confirm that what made the most impact to me then as a student is exactly what the senior professor tells his successors.

“I teach that if the heart is empty, it doesn’t make any difference how full the head [is],” said Overfelt.

Many have credited him for their decisions to remain in their professions, learning how to better educate and, in the process, have fun. Which leads me to say this… Maybe I ought to commission a therapy session with Dr. Overfelt on demotivating Mondays.

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Brighten Up The Future For Underprivileged Kids

They say the future is millennial, with a touch of Gen Z. With teens making headlines for diagnosing eye diseases and generating clean energy via passing traffic, I wouldn’t doubt it for a second. Still, where tomorrow looks bright for some, the sun has set on others. Despite a constantly advancing society, poverty often plagues potential, and a lack of opportunities for young minds persists. All the same, there is an abundance of ways to help underprivileged kids get hold of the opportunities they deserve.

For young professionals on the go, donating in cash or kind is a perfectly safe and practical option. While necessities such as clothing and food are useful options to circulate within youth groups, most prefer monetary pledges. This is because shelters can break down a budget to its greatest efficiency as they are familiar with their tenants’ needs. Regardless, materials such as school supplies and other equipment are welcome all year-round.

Instead of dedicating your weekends to B-movies on Netflix, lend your skills to an organization of your choice. As with most volunteer programs, schedules are flexible — so why not use your downtime to bring smiles to kids who need it? In place of an academic education, you can teach dozens of juveniles the handy art of stitching, or perhaps toy-building. You never know when brightening your impromptu students’ day with a lesson in programming can set passions on fire.

If fitness gets you going, coaching a sport may be just your caliber. The goal isn’t to craft the next LeBron James or Cristiano Ronaldo, but to mold team players. Game mechanics aren’t the simplest of things, but your trainees may walk away with a brand-new life skill. And anyway, what ten-year-old isn’t a fan of running wild with a ball or racket in hand?

Be that as it may, crawling through the mud isn’t everyone’s forte. For avid literature geeks or voracious art enthusiasts, take your kids on a field trip. Museums may not be every second-grader’s cup of tea, but a planetarium or dino-exhibit may just be up their alley. On the plus side, they’ll learn a thing or two. Being able to name a prehistoric animal other than a T-Rex usually earn plus points in a classroom setting.

Taking part in a youth group often makes bonds with certain children inevitable. You may be keen on the pigtailed girl with the square glasses or buck-toothed boy who can’t quit rambling about Pokemon. Your undeniable connection with a bright-eyed mass of unrestrained energy might inspire you to sponsor a child. By all means, it’s life-changing. The possibilities? Limitless. And the best part is being able to visit and stay in touch with your surrogate sibling.

Kids are the building blocks of what lies ahead and it’s us older siblings who have the tools to guarantee it. If you’re an only child, it’s the perfect opportunity to bring someone into the picture. If you aren’t? The more the merrier.

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Work For Your Meal At This Tokyo Restaurant

Some restaurants give out free meals to the needy. Others make you work for it. At Mirai Shokudo (Future Eatery) in Tokyo, customers either pay for a meal — or work an hour for one. Run single-handedly by Sekai Kobayashi, the unique dining experience teaches individuals the value of diligence.

“It’s an exciting job because I work with a new person every time. It’s interesting to develop a good rapport and work with others,” said [Kobayashi.]

Students are Mirai Shokudo’s most frequent customers — and what better a demographic to learn true independence? Despite the free lunches, Kobayashi’s business remains profitable thanks to open-sourcing. Feedback allows the ambitious entrepreneur to make improvements and remain on top of her game.

“Sharing something with others means supporting those with ambition. That underpins my approach to work,” she said.

In Tokyo without a bill to spare? No problem — just head on over to Mirai Shokudo!

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