Superhero Pope Francis Shirts Help the Poor

There are a dozen different ways to help the poor outside of huge monetary donations. This Anatolian restaurant is feeding the needy for free. This Philippine community is building bleach lamps from plastic bottles for households without electricity. Graffiti artist MauPal is using Pope Francis as an icon of hope, creating “Superpope” t-shirts to help Vatican-sponsored charities.

“With the economic and social crisis that hit Italy and the world, I saw Francis as a symbol of hope for all,” the artist said.

“I graphically summed up a widely-shared opinion of the pope as someone with a lot of power who is also humane and humble at the same time.”

The Pope Francis shirts aren’t MauPal’s only masterpieces. In previous years, the artist depicted the Pope in various playful forms as street art. However, city cleaners were less than pleased, scrubbing the works off walls near St. Peter’s Basilica.

It was only after that MauPal made the remaining sketches appear on the Pope Francis shirts. And while some are also not appreciative of the cartoon tees, the Pope himself has expressed his approval.

“I offered him the drawing I had painted on a simple piece of wood, a medium I thought fit his (anti-luxury) philosophy. He looked at me, he smiled at me, then he affectionately pinched my cheek,” MauPal said.

If the Pope himself gives a thumbs-up to your work of kindness, you must be doing something right. And more importantly, if the Pope has given your artwork the smiley rubber stamp, well, I’d say you must be pretty skilled with a pencil!

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Abandoned Castle Gets A Funky Makeover

Some long-forgotten buildings remain perpetually neglected and in the past. Even the most prestigious have-been structures don’t always get a second chance. Spanish artist Okuda San Miguel hopes to change this–at least for one abandoned castle in France.

Spanish street artist Okuda San Miguel… is known for creating prismatic, geometric murals that cover abandoned historic churches, city streets, high-rises, and the sides of trucks and trains. Okuda has transformed an abandoned 19th-century chateau in France’s Loire Valley into a pop art paradise.

The makeover is going to promote a French street art festival, LaBel Valette. While street art is usually given a bad rep, it seems Okuda is turning things around.

The mural’s title is Skull in the Mirror. Okuda painted two large-scale geometric skulls across the castle’s white facade, and added colorful polka dots and paint accents to the remaining blank surfaces.

Looks like Lichtenstein proteges are going to have to step aside. Skull in the Mirror is nothing short of astounding!

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