Kidney Donees Bond Over Same-Donor Transplants

Just last month, twin sisters Marian and Mary Jane Fields took their sisterhood to the next level after undergoing a skin transplant. Now, kidney donees Annie MacDonald and Kim Moncion are bonding over their same-donor transplants. While their medical conditions were hard to deal with, their experience has brought them closer than ever.

“I looked into it and I was like, ‘Oh my goodness, she’s literally down the road,'” MacDonald said.

“We’ve got a connection now… We’re kidney twins.”

Doctors broke the good news to MacDonald after five years on dialysis, while Moncion was luckier, waiting in the wings only a few months. MacDonald is hoping to reach out to the donor’s family in order to thank them for saving her life.

“Hopefully in a year I can send a letter to the family to let them know how grateful I am,” she said.

“They’re my hero. It’s amazing what gift they’ve given us. Even if I don’t hear back, at least I can reach out and tell them how happy I am and what they’ve given me.”

Dr. Derek Chaudhary, who tended to both women, is hosting a kidney walk to honor not only MacDonald and Moncion, but all patients in need of transplants. The fresh donees are proof that good can come of the darkest of moments.

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Man Treats 70 Strangers To Thanksgiving Dinner

People in predicaments will often feel for others in similar situations. When new mom Elisabeth Anderson-Sierra learned she could produce more breastmilk than usual, she donated 5,000 pints to parents-in-need. Having to spend Thanksgiving alone since 1985, Scott Macaulay is treating strangers to a turkey meal for the 32nd year in a row.

“The whole idea of this is to replicate somebody’s home,” he says. “I bring in sofas, oriental rugs and fake fireplaces so that everyone will feel like they’re in somebody’s living room. Then, I put myself in charge of the cooking and some of the guests chip in to serve dinner and clean up.”

Hosting dinner at the Greet Street Baptist Church, Macaulay says the gatherings are less about the food and more about family. Many of his visitors are widows and widowers or single parents. Macaulay’s ex-wife even once made an appearance. After the meal, guests share what they are most thankful for.

“I save all of their submissions because it’s sentimental,” he [says]. “Most people are thankful for their health, while others are thankful for things like, ‘My son is now speaking to me.’ Everything always comes from the heart.”

Who knew turkey could bring people together?

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