Blind Woman Represents US in International Triathlon

Constantly reading and writing about the kindness and heroism of some people inevitably make me reflect upon their stories. And I’ve noticed an important pattern. First, age doesn’t really matter — a 58-year-old woman can save factory workers from a fire, a 4-year-old girl can donate her tiny allowance to a cancer patient, and a 99-year-old man can even break a world record on swimming. And neither can status hinder people from being kind or heroic — a multi-billion company can surely fund children’s hospitals, but an ordinary ticket agent can save children from human trafficking.

Today’s reflection involves another thing that cannot hinder people from achieving extraordinary things: disability. This is proven by a blind woman from San Diego named Amy Dixon, who will represent the United States in the 2020 Paralympics, to be held in Tokyo. She will be competing in the triathlon.

When Dixon is not working to improve her best personal race time, she is working on improving the lives of those in our community. For the past two years, she has held camps that teaches the visually and audibly impaired how to race in triathlons. Additionally, Dixon has been able to raise enough money each year to provide this camp at no cost to its participants.

Also known as “Super Woman,” Amy Dixon only has 2% of her vision left. But looking at her community work and sports career, this has not left the blind woman helpless. In fact, it seemed to do the opposite, as she has been inspired to accomplish so much, not only in the field of sports.

While working to better the lives of those impaired, she is actively working on saving the sight of others through her work as the Vice President of the Glaucoma Eyes International Foundation . . . Since she is such an inspiration to San Diego, Senator Joel Anderson recently honored Dixon’s efforts by presenting her with a certificate of recognition for her tremendous athletic achievements and her dedication to better the lives of those in our community.

If we cannot let age, status, and disability be significant in performing great deeds and becoming our best selves, then what else matters? I think, if you have time to reflect upon many people’s lives (and I hope you do), then you’ll be quick to answer this. For now, here’s a clue: it starts with an h, ends with a t, and in the middle, has a bodily organ used to listen. To really find the answer, maybe you should listen to your heart. Wink.

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Brighten Up The Future For Underprivileged Kids

They say the future is millennial, with a touch of Gen Z. With teens making headlines for diagnosing eye diseases and generating clean energy via passing traffic, I wouldn’t doubt it for a second. Still, where tomorrow looks bright for some, the sun has set on others. Despite a constantly advancing society, poverty often plagues potential, and a lack of opportunities for young minds persists. All the same, there is an abundance of ways to help underprivileged kids get hold of the opportunities they deserve.

For young professionals on the go, donating in cash or kind is a perfectly safe and practical option. While necessities such as clothing and food are useful options to circulate within youth groups, most prefer monetary pledges. This is because shelters can break down a budget to its greatest efficiency as they are familiar with their tenants’ needs. Regardless, materials such as school supplies and other equipment are welcome all year-round.

Instead of dedicating your weekends to B-movies on Netflix, lend your skills to an organization of your choice. As with most volunteer programs, schedules are flexible — so why not use your downtime to bring smiles to kids who need it? In place of an academic education, you can teach dozens of juveniles the handy art of stitching, or perhaps toy-building. You never know when brightening your impromptu students’ day with a lesson in programming can set passions on fire.

If fitness gets you going, coaching a sport may be just your caliber. The goal isn’t to craft the next LeBron James or Cristiano Ronaldo, but to mold team players. Game mechanics aren’t the simplest of things, but your trainees may walk away with a brand-new life skill. And anyway, what ten-year-old isn’t a fan of running wild with a ball or racket in hand?

Be that as it may, crawling through the mud isn’t everyone’s forte. For avid literature geeks or voracious art enthusiasts, take your kids on a field trip. Museums may not be every second-grader’s cup of tea, but a planetarium or dino-exhibit may just be up their alley. On the plus side, they’ll learn a thing or two. Being able to name a prehistoric animal other than a T-Rex usually earn plus points in a classroom setting.

Taking part in a youth group often makes bonds with certain children inevitable. You may be keen on the pigtailed girl with the square glasses or buck-toothed boy who can’t quit rambling about Pokemon. Your undeniable connection with a bright-eyed mass of unrestrained energy might inspire you to sponsor a child. By all means, it’s life-changing. The possibilities? Limitless. And the best part is being able to visit and stay in touch with your surrogate sibling.

Kids are the building blocks of what lies ahead and it’s us older siblings who have the tools to guarantee it. If you’re an only child, it’s the perfect opportunity to bring someone into the picture. If you aren’t? The more the merrier.

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Senior Swimmer Sets Freestyle World Record

World records and the elderly don’t usually ring a bell, unless you’re talking giant casseroles. All the same, some aren’t letting the “old and wretched” stereotype fly, especially not George Corones. The Australian swimmer recently broke the 50-meter long course record by 35 seconds — and he’s 99-years-old!

“It was an exemplary swim for me, well balanced… and I was ready to hit the [wall] at the end very hard with my hand,” he [said].

The superstar senior swam the length in just 56.12 seconds, for the 100 – 104 years men’s category. I didn’t even know people lived that long. Corones’ swimming career was put on hold during World War II and re-commenced at the age of 80.

“I gave it up at the beginning of the war [World War Two], and I don’t think I had a swim of any description until I retired,” he added.

“I started swimming again for exercise.”

Looks like exercise brought this aging man of steel a long, long way! (To the Commonwealth Games trials, to be exact)

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Sustainable Jogging Is Sweden’s Newest Fad

Getting strangers to clean up after themselves almost always involves an incentive. For Starbucks regulars, it’s a 5p charge on single-use cups. For Freiburg Cup users, its a 1 euro tip back for returns. But for the Swedish community, cleaning-as-you-go is simply an everyday habit — and it’s called plogging.

“It’s not that everyone should be running about picking up other people’s litter. It should be put in the bin in the first place. But I believe all of us should make an effort to keep our surroundings clean.” [said jogging group leader Anna Christopherson.]

The exercise, which has now gained traction in Scotland, pays homage to the Swedish word “plocka.” Meaning both to jog and pick up, the play on words is perfect. Mastermind Christopherson has even incorporated stretching into the mix.

“Quite a few joggers already take it on themselves to pick up litter when they see it in their running spots. Having a whole group of joggers doing this regularly could make a real difference to parks, paths and pavements.”

For some, giving back is less of a hassle when it’s convenient. For ploggers, it’s just another tick on the to-do list.

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Goalie Helps Opponent Catch Birth Of Baby Son

I believe that people are inherently good. Strangers can volunteer to return a missing family pet across state. Entire communities can gather together to raise funds for a family in need. Regardless of who a person is, kindness is almost always in anyone’s nature. Latest to reflect this mantra is Griffins goalie Tom McCollum, who lent his pick-up to opponent Pierre-Cedric Labrie to catch the birth of his son.

“I’ve never actually met PC, but I played against him a bunch when he was in Rockford,” McCollum said… “He’s one of those … you can just tell he’s an honest hockey player.

At the time, Labrie’s only option was to fly and miss the birth, until the sympathetic McCollum stepped in. In lieu of a chauffeur, Labrie then braved the Milwaukee snowstorm in the borrowed truck.

“He offered to pay me for (using the truck),” McCollum said. “I just asked him to fill it up with gas, and he was nice enough he washed it for me before he gave it back. That’s all I need honestly.”

In just under six hours, Labrie and his wife welcomed baby Lionel. Hockey may be tough, but there’s always a little room for bromance.

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These Rock-Climbing Shoes Are Made Of Recyclables

This year, sustainable fashion has become an inescapable trend — and we’re not complaining. All sorts of materials are being reused to create wearables that are identical to pieces that are entirely new. We’ve seen the birth of sportswear made from coffee and running shoes made with algae. Now, popular athletics brand La Sportiva has produced rock-climbing shoes made of almost entirely recycled materials.

La Sportiva put a spin on its latest model with the addition of the Eco Rubber, completely rebranding the otherwise harmful process used in the production of climbing shoes. The company utilizes biodegradable leather for the sole of the shoe and a tanning process that is completely metal free — no traces of mercury or chrome to be found.

The brand combines and repurposes leftover material to create the Eco Rubber. They also use fishing net to create laces and webbing.

The Mythos is an iconic climbing shoe that has been in La Sportiva’s arsenal for over a quarter of a century. Tried and true to boot, climbers covet the comfortable moccasin-style shoe that adapts to the shape of your foot.

Brands as renowned as La Sportiva becoming more eco-conscious is just what the industry needs. All they require is a gentle push.

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