“Brainternet” Brings The Human Mind Online

The human brain knows no limits. The fact that we only use 10% of it remains a myth, as antennas and bendable batteries are furthering biomedical engineering. Lately, researchers at Wits University in Johannesburg have made the greatest breakthrough yet with the “Brainternet.” (But it’s not exactly what you might think!)

The project works by taking brainwave EEG signals gathered by an Emotiv EEG device connected to the user’s head. The signals are then transmitted to a low cost Raspberry Pi computer, which live streams the data to an application programming interface and displays the data on an open website where anyone can view the activity.

In essence, you can download information about your brain and pretty much study the thing. So, no, you can’t update your Twitter in your sleep. However, the technology is still potentially valuable in transferring brain data.

“Brainternet can be further improved to classify recordings through a smart phone app that will provide data for a machine-learning algorithm. In [the] future, there could be information transferred in both directions – inputs and outputs to the brain,”

Sorry to disappoint you, millennials, but keep in mind that understanding brain functions could make mind-controlling Facebook possible eventually. For now, stick to a MacBook.

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Use Mind Control To Play This Virtual Reality Game

I recently established that, while it come with its risks, technology isn’t actually killing us. The rate at which developments are taking place is at an all time high. While we may not have superpowers yet, we are close to it being a possibility. In fact, startup Neurable had created a virtual reality game played using mind control.

It works with an electrode-laden headband that connects to an HTC Vive virtual-reality headset. The technology behind the game… uses dry electrodes placed on the scalp and electroencephalography to track brain activity. Software analyzes this signal and figures out what should happen in the game.

The gameplay is simple — you play as a child escaping a government lab by throwing toys at various targets. While this may not entice many hardcore gamers, you may want to think about the fact that you are moving things just by thinking about them. 

The demo starts with a calibration process during which [players call] out toys—train, plane, and so on—and a person wearing the headset and electrodes [can] accurately and quickly select them from the circle of floating objects in front of [them] in virtual space.

Neurable hopes to develop a more complex game without the need for training. Clashing with the complicated nature of the brain, I can’t imagine a more elaborate game. Bring on the mind tricks!

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