Wild Wolves Are Making A Comeback In Rome

Wild tigers are resurfacing in Kazakhstan after a 70-year absence and it seems Italy may be experiencing something quite similar. Wild wolves, a symbol of the country, are making a comeback in the outskirts of Rome after nearly a century.

“This is the first time in more than 100 years that wolves have been found living near Rome,” [said professor of natural sciences] Alessia De Lorenzis.

“We think they probably arrived here from the area around Lake Bracciano, north of Rome, where wolves have always existed, even when the species was pushed towards extinction,”

Biologists spotted the wild wolves roaming a reserve in Castel di Guido. They are of no apparent threat to livestock, as they survive on a diet of wild boars. Researchers have blamed their initial demise on hunting.

Killing wolves was encouraged in Italy until the 1970s, by which time only 100 or so individuals remained in Italy. But the species was given protected status in 1971 and has since gradually recovered.

There are around 1,500 – 2,000 wolves inhabiting Italy, with others bordering France. French farmers have claimed that the slender beasts have been attacking their sheep. But then again, perhaps it’s time we listen more to the animals’ needs and less to ours. Based on studies of animal extinction or endangerment, we could surmise it isn’t really the animals crying wolf, is it?

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Supposedly Extinct Species Resurfaces In Australia

Devoted animal activists are doing what they can to prevent dwindling wildlife populations from perishing. While Kazakhstan is manually reintroducing wild tigers, Indonesian authorities are catching pangolin smugglers red-handed. For the “extinct” crest-tailed mulgara, no human intervention brought the carnivorous critter back to life. It simply showed up after an entire century.

“Next year we are due to begin introduced predator and rabbit eradication for a large area, which will no doubt help the mulgara,” Reece Pedler, project coordinator of Wild Deserts, says.

The tiny, blonde insect-muncher is a cousin to the Tasmanian devil and acts as a midday lunch for foxes and cats. For a hundred years, passersby only experienced the mouse-like creature in bone fragments. Now, Australia is prepared to keep the species alive.

The conservation project will set up Sturt National Park as a sanctuary with two fenced exoclosures to keep predators away. After those have been erected, locally extinct mammals… will be reintroduced.

Looks like athletes aren’t the only ones making a comeback!

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