Modified Chickens Are Laying Cancer-Fighting Eggs

With alternative treatments for cancer on the rise, we’re also seeing an increase in unusual remedies. If anything from avocado husks to flexible batteries are on the market, using livestock should be no surprise. At least not to engineers in Japan. Researchers are genetically modifying chickens to lay eggs filled with cancer-preventing drugs.

The eggs were developed using genome-editing technology to produce a protein called interferon, which is used to treat hepatitis, multiple sclerosis and malignant skin cancer.

Injecting it into cancer patients three times per week can prevent cancer cells from multiplying, while also boosting T cells to fight tumors.

Conventionally, interferon costs anywhere between $250 to $900. Interferon from chicken eggs, on the other hand, won’t have patients clucking up more than half the price. What remains to be more dangerous than cancer itself is the price tag that comes with therapy.

“Cancer drugs are not a luxury item, like an expensive car, that people can choose to buy or not to buy…. When prices come down, mortality rates will surely follow.” [said Brian Bolwell of the Cleveland Clinic.]

Perhaps, one day we’ll all agree that curing cancer isn’t about the money. Kudos, Mr. Bolwell. Kudos.

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Internet Raises Money For Hotdog Vendor

If you place your woes on social media, chances are the Internet community will reach out to you. It helped this high school student reclaim her stolen college money. It even helped this young deaf boy purchase hearing aids for those in need. When the Internet heard about a cop confiscating $60 from an unlicensed hotdog vendor, they raised over $60,000 for the sausage aficionado.

“The funds raised will be utilized to cover legal and personal losses,” [witness Martin] Flores wrote on the GoFundMe page. “In addition, funds in excess are to cover other vendors who have been robbed of their hard earned living through citations and removal of their carts.”

While the UC Berkeley officer remains on the job, more than 35,000 people have signed a petition to have him removed from the force. The vendor’s lack of a sales permit apparently “justified” the seizure of earnings.

Some authority figures will inevitably continue to abuse their power. But it sure is nice to know that we can count on our friends online to keep the peace.

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Spread The Charitable Holiday Cheer On A Budget

Rolling into the “ber” months has many of us anticipating the upcoming holidays. While December usually means plastic pine trees from Home Depot and the return of Starbucks’ secret menu, it is also a time of giving. Though it’s the simplest and most practical way to help others in need, we aren’t all equipped to donate money. (That is, of course, unless you’re Bill Gates) However, there are a plethora of different ways to spread the charitable holiday cheer on a budget — and it may be more rewarding than you think.

Making a physical donation is easily the most viable option for holiday busybodies. If money isn’t exactly on your side, choose to donate in kind. Considering that the Christmas season rakes in a lot of presents, there are probably household items you can choose to live without. You can pledge clothing to shelters and toys to children’s groups. Books can go to your local library and appliances or electronics can end up in Goodwill. Of course, it is best to ensure that the items in your “give” box are in good condition.

If you can spare a day being proactive, you can opt to give your time. Charities don’t only seek checks and boxes — they need people. Volunteer at a home, whether for the elderly, ill, or four-legged. Chances are, there will be a lot for you to do. A rise in nonprofit groups may leave you with a copious amount of options. If you’re unsure of where to start, figure out where your interests lie and what skills you have to offer. This is where making a list and checking it twice may come in handy. (Scoot over, Santa)

If you are keen on raising funds, plan something income-generating like a garage sale or auction. If you’re without a charity of choice, research a group that could use the money. Remember that you will make the greatest impact by sticking to one organization. A few hundred dollars will go a long way for a single cause as opposed to dividing costs between various groups.

Some people love experiencing the immediate effects of giving back. If you’re handy in the kitchen, consider running a food drive. Get your neighborhood in on the action. Decide what meals are easiest to throw together, and are most cost-efficient. Not only will you satisfy a handful of hungry tummies — you’ll bring the community together.

Needing a change? Or are you simply not so squeamish? Make a medical donation. Blood drives are common during the holidays and a perfectly suitable option for those who have managed to stay in shape. (Perhaps skip the fruit cake?) If you’re not too hot for needles, donate your hair! You’ll be surprised how many people are affected by hair loss due to medical conditions. Moms can also donate breast milk to milk banks.

Giving back can be rewarding, especially if you have the money to do so. But you can choose to be charitable every single day. The time you take to change someone’s life will likely be more meaningful than just a dollar bill.

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Auctioned Navajo Blanket Saves Man From Poverty

Hardly is it the case that sheer fate can turn a person’s life around. But after a rare thrift store find sent two high school students to university, it seemed no one was taking any chances. California native Loren Krytzer struck gold when he auctioned an heirloom blanket for $1.5 million.

“It was just hard to grasp,” [Krytzer] says. “I mean, I worked hard my whole life. I was in construction, I never bought anything, I never saved, I always rented. I bought used cars cause that’s all I could afford. I lived paycheck to paycheck my whole life.”

The former carpenter and amputee was living on $200 a month with the help of disability funding.  Krytzer only realized the blanket’s worth after stumbling upon a television special featuring variations of the item. With the help of auctioneer Jeff Moran, Krytzer saw to it that his bank account would receive a healthy refill.

“I firmly believe I’m here because years ago I turned my life around,” he says. “The things I’ve been through, I tell people it’s a strong faith and a strong mind. Without those things you’re not going to make it.”

Don’t get me wrong–hard work still remains the true catalyst of success. But a little bit of luck does taste pretty sweet.

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4-Year-Old Donates Allowance To Cop With Cancer

Let’s be real — the notion that our children know nothing about the value of money is a myth. Kids across the nation have donated their savings to disaster victims and the deaf community, among other groups. Next to climb on board the donation train is Sidney Fahrenbruch. The 4-year-old pledged her entire piggy bank to help a policeman with cancer.

“It all started about two years ago when she saw an officer directing traffic. It was hot outside and she said, ‘He looks thirsty; he needs water,’ and she brought him a bottle of water,’” [said Sidney’s mother Megan.]

Sidney, an avid fan of the Longmont Police Department, donated $9 to Officer Kyle Zulauf. The army vet was diagnosed with pancreatic cancer in 2015. A regular at the precinct delivering cookies and candies, Sidney has surely done her mother proud.

“It feels good that she’s so giving. She wanted to save the money for a toy but decided someone needed it more than her,” said Fahrenbruch.

 When Barbies and Nerf guns are all the craze at age 4, I can say with certainty that Sidney is doing pretty darn well.
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Swiss Town To Pay Families £50,000 To Move In

In a new age of technology, tradition is becoming outdated. Still, small, independent groups are attempting to keep bits of history alive. Just recently, students from a Hong Kong university paid tribute to bamboo weaving in Peitian. The project proved impactful but modest, whereas other communities are taking a more urgent approach. To keep afloat, the Swiss village of Albinen is offering potential residents up to £50,000 to migrate in.

The council will soon be voting on the new initiative, which aims to repopulate a community that has dwindled to just 240 residents.

Like with all attractive propositions, the move comes with a catch — several of them. Takers must be below the age of 45 and live in a 200,000-franc residence for at least 10 years. You’ll also need to learn German. And while you may still be salivating over the promise of a hefty check, there is little to do in Albinen.

There’s little going on in the town’s centre, save for its narrow cobbled turns, centuries-old houses, a church and a shop.

That being said, with good company and a zest for the outdoors, Albinen may be the place for you.

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Realtor Repays Man For Returning Missing Check

In the midst of tragedy and political turmoil, we tend to forget that good samaritans exist everywhere. Whether they’re fixing a busted tooth for free or sheltering dozens from a storm, the goal is always kindness. Some do-gooders have next to nothing, and expect only a simple thanks for their selfless acts. When homeless Connecticut native Elmer Alvarez returned a $10,000 check to realtor Roberta Hoskie, he anticipated just that. However, the New Haven business owner refused to let the deed simply pass, rewarding Alvarez with a scholarship, job counseling, and housing.

“What I did, finding that check and returning it, I would do it all over again,” [Alvarez] said.

Hoskie admitted she felt deeply for Alvarez, having once been homeless herself. She also arranged for him to learn English as a second language. Seemingly too good to be true, the favors came only with a simple catch.

“When you get on your feet, you go ahead and you do it for the next person and the next person and the next person and the next person,” [Hoskie] said.

It’s random acts of kindness that start chain reactions. All we need to do is keep the ball rolling.

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L.A. Parking Meter Collects Charity Donations

Charity vending machines in Nottingham and Salt Lake are indubitably the beginning of a giving revolution. Now that consumers can donate food, clothing, and even cattle with the push of a button, the trend is taking flight in various other forms. Plagued by homelessness, Los Angeles is giving back to its transients via charity meters.

All six of the meters will be located in Downtown Los Angeles, and revenue will go toward the Skid Row-based C3 program, a cooperation between the city, county, and local service providers that provides outreach to homeless residents and helps them find housing.

Sure, parking meters aren’t a particularly welcoming machine, but the principle behind these ones is. Alongside cash donations, sponsors will also generate as much as $3,500 a year.

The meters look similar to ones already up-and-running in Pasadena: virtually identical to a run-of-the-mill parking meter, but colored bright orange and set back from the street to avoid confusion about their purpose. Donations can be made using both coins and credit cards.

The machines, sporting a bright yellow smiling emoji help donors avoid panhandling. With four more yet to rise across the city, hopefully other states catch onto the meter fever.

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Library Books Are Free To Rent For L.A. Kids

In places like New York, educational institutions are becoming less restrictive towards low-income families. This is so much so that children are now enjoying free lunches to ease financial burdens and prevent bullying. But the fact remains — many continue to struggle with other expenses such as tuition fees and school materials. Realizing the sheer significance of free knowledge, L.A. County has waived library fees for readers under 21.

“When charges accrue on a young person’s account, generally, they don’t pay the charges and they don’t use the card,” [library administrator Darcy] Hastings said. “A few dollars on their accounts means they stop using library services.”

As past fines persist, the county is also offering a “Read Away” service for young bookworms. Simply by picking out a novel to digest for an afternoon, students can eliminate fees at $5 an hour.

“You tell them you’ll read and they’ll sign you in and you start,” said Leilany, a fifth-grader at Morris K. Hamasaki Elementary in East L.A. “When your head starts losing the book you can stop reading and they tell you how much money they took away.”

Reading for fun and paying off debts? Sounds like a win-win for literature lovers looking to knock off a couple of bucks!

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Cult Party Game Takes On Income Inequality

While it isn’t everything, money can certainly get a person on their feet. When Kate McClure raised $227,000 for a homeless veteran, income inequality became more evident than ever. Now approaching it head-on, Cards Against Humanity gave $1,000 to 100 people in need.

“Giving 100 people $1,000 doesn’t fix wealth inequality,” the game’s website reads. “But we think these stories are a clear demonstration of how much $1,000 means to someone struggling to pay for basic necessities.”

The experiment called for 150,000 netizens to sign up, redistributing funds to the less economically fortunate. Testimonials claimed the money would go to anything from Christmas gifts to paying off student loans.

Most Americans can’t come up with $400 in an emergency, and one in five American households have zero or negative wealth,” Cards Against Humanity explains on its website.

To some, $1,000 may be just another paycheck. To others, it might mean the world.

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