5-Year-Old Provides Classmates With Milk Money

If we are born inherently good, we see the best of it in our kids. Thanks to technology, children of all ages have been raising funds for various causes. In just a little over a month, kids have pooled money for deaf communities and Puerto Ricans in need. In rural Michigan, another kindergartener is stepping into the charitable spotlight, raising $5,000 for her classmates’ milk funds.

Sunshine has 20 classmates, and about half can’t afford milk. Milk costs 45 cents per carton, so Sunshine would need $800 to buy her classmates milk every day for one school year.

Initially, the cheery, pigtailed 5-year-old donated $30 of piggy bank money to a friend. Impressed by her initiative, Sunshine’s grandmother Jackie Oelfke decided to help her crowdfund. Naturally, this prompted the pair to set up a GoFundMe page.

Her GoFundMe campaign has been going for ten days so far, and today it surpassed its $5,000 goal — enough to give her classmates milk money until they’re well into the fourth grade.

It seems Sunshine is filling both her classmates’ pockets and tummies!

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Yellow Peas Are The New Milk

In the food industry, nothing is what it seems. At Ava Winery, wine is grape-less. Popular distillery Misadventure and Co. is producing vodka made with food waste. Ripple is not far behind, introducing an entire line of dairy products made with yellow peas.

“The food system represents 20 percent of the world’s carbon emissions, and dairy is one-quarter of that,” said [co-founder Neil] Renninger… “The impact is massive. More than beef, more than chicken, dairy is actually the largest contributor to emissions by volume. That challenge scratched my sustainability itch.”

Since its launch, Ripple has sold a healthy 2.5 million bottles of plant-based products. Renninger and partner Adam Lowry admitted that most plant food “sucks” because the industry doesn’t spend enough time doing research to create better food items. To be honest, I couldn’t agree more.

“Their idea of innovation is a brand extension . . . We saw huge potential for impact—a lot of white space in the world of food innovation through technology.”

Yellow peas, Ripple’s ingredient of choice, isn’t strongly flavored and is relatively inexpensive to grow. It also provides a sufficient amount of protein, significantly more than almond milk does. Eliminating 3.5 pounds of carbon emissions per 48-ounce bottle, Ripple has a lot to brag about.

“It’s not that we have the only pea milk on the market; what makes us unique is that, thanks to technology, we have the purest plant protein in the world,” says Renninger.

And with its pea milk currently coming in five different flavors, I can’t imagine Ripple is going out of business anytime soon.

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Edible Coffee Capsules Combat Plastic Pollution

For people on the go, coffee is a must-have. While many shops offer bring-your-own-tumbler discounts, for most, a take-out paper cup will do. They aren’t the easiest to recycle, but its plastic creamer capsules that take the cake. To combat plastic pollution, scientists invented edible coffee capsules for cream and sugar. This is another feat for the coffee industry, which recently involved coffee grounds in the making of sportswear.

The capsules are made with a crystalline, sugary layer that keeps the milk sealed inside at room temperature. Once added to your drink, the capsule dissolves and unleashes the douse of milky sweetness.

There are two types of capsules — sucrose capsules for a sweeter touch, and erythritol capsules for something more bitter. The milk, if sealed, remains good for three weeks.

“The capsules could replace the small, extremely unpractical coffee creamer packaging that is used in great quantities at conferences or on airplanes,”

Creators of the Keurig cup and Nespresso pod have since expressed regret for engineering such environmentally damaging products. After all, we shouldn’t seek convenience at the expense of the environment.

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