Mexico Creates World’s Largest Marine Reserve

To prevent passersby having to rescue beached whales, activists are looking for ways to better protect marine life. Some are turning to lab-grown meat to combat overfishing, while others are dealing with poachers up front. Determined to keep their own Revillagigedo Islands afloat, Mexico is placing 57,000 square miles under protection.

“It’s an important place biologically for megafauna, kind of superhighway, if you will, for sharks, manta rays, whales and turtles,” [said] Matt Rand, director of the Pew Bertarelli Ocean Legacy Project… “It’s a pretty biologically spectacular location.”

Altogether, the islands are home to 366 species of fish, as well as a vast number of plants and birds. Though fishing villages have expressed concern, conservationists have assured that the reserve will help catch populations to quickly rise.

“We have a long way to go,” [Rand] says. “But there’s been incredible growth in the concept of large-scale marine protected areas. It’s almost becoming a race. Hopefully it’s starting to snowball.”

To conserve ecosystems, at least 30% of the ocean must remain untouched. I’d say 57,000 square miles is a pretty good start.

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Search Dog Is Tracking Survivors In Mexico

Some dogs, such as Diesel, who saved his owners from a house fire, are heroes to their families. Other dogs are heroes to complete strangers. Meet Frida, a seven-year-old search dog tracking survivors of the Mexico earthquake.

In her career, Frida has located 12 people alive beneath the rubble plus more than 40 others dead, more than any other Mexican rescue dog… She has put her nose to work in disasters such as an earthquake in Ecuador last year, another one in southern Mexico two weeks ago, a landslide in Guatemala in 2015 and a Mexico City gas explosion in 2013.

The heroic Labrador has made such an impression that she has appeared on tattoos and an unofficial 500 peso bill. After all, dogs and social media are the best of pals. Frida has spent most of her rescue antics at a school in southern Mexico.

“It’s a source of pride to work with Frida. She’s a very, very special dog,” said Israel Arauz, her handler for the past two years.

Alongside Frida work several other search dogs, all part of the Mexican Navy. In a year, Frida will retire to live with Arauz, dedicating her hardworking nose to the smell of treats.

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