Permaculture Farm Is Feeding Families In Australia

At present, some 795 million people don’t get the proper nourishment they need. While the number is staggering, only a few farms and soup kitchens are taking action. This Australian family is playing its part, feeding dozens of families with produce from its 1-acre permaculture farm.

At Limestone Permaculture Farm, they grow organic produce, raise sheep goats and chickens, keep bees, and even build with recycled materials. Much of the farm is powered by energy from wood, water, and the sun.

In essence, permaculture pays homage to natural ecosystems and how they function. Instead of growing a single crop in large-scale, permaculture integrates symbiosis so different plants may flourish. Owners of Limestone, Nici and Brett Cooper, believe that permaculture is the future of food.

“We feel there has been an awakening across our beautiful country, self-reliance is on the rise again; urban and rural homesteading has people taking their food and energy supply back into their own hands.”

To encourage the unique farming technique, the Coopers offer workshops, internships, and permaculture design programs to tourists. As it seems, permaculture is opening doors for rural communities and, in turn, also helping out the needy.

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Is Fly Larvae The Next Superfood?

Over the years, countries outside of Asia and Africa have opened up to stranger delicacies. A pub in Brussels is serving crickets in a variety of flavors. Jumping on the insect bandwagon is Entocycle, a startup attempting to turn fly larvae into a source of protein.

Not only can the larvae of black soldier flies be made into animal feed, but they also gobble down food waste during their short lives, doubling the environmental benefits of Entocycle’s automated system.

Okay, so we’re not going to be feasting on worm burgers anytime soon, but we can remain optimistic about our livestock and aquaculture. The larvae are also easy to raise.

The larvae of black soldier flies… will feast on organic waste from [a] large range of sources, including breweries and commercial kitchens. Because they are not picky [about] what they eat, black soldier flies are well-suited to being raised in an automated system.

Female black soldier flies can lay up to 1,000 eggs at a time. Harvesters use 5% of eggs to repopulate new cycles. They hatch the other 95% and turn them into feed as quickly as within a week.

The process is simple and affordable, which makes it no surprise that Entocycle has raised $1 million in grant money. Insect protein may not yet be the norm, but holds promise for the near future.

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Locals Rescue Animals From Mount Agung Eruption

In the midst of a disaster, there are always appropriate methods of reaching out to victims. What we sometimes appear to forget is that animals are part of the demographic. That doesn’t seem to be the case for Bali locals, who are frantically relocating cows and monkeys away from an active volcano.

Mount Agung, about 75km from the resort hub of Kuta, has been shaking since August, causing 144,000 people to evacuate their homes over the past week as experts warn an eruption could be imminent.

The volcano has since triggered hundreds of earthquakes by the hour. The Jakarta Animal Aid Network has deployed a 12-man team to carry out the dangerous rescue mission. While a dozen people may seem futile, I’ve got to hand it to them for hiking some 12 km for pigs and chickens.

“Emotionally, it’s really hard for the farmers to part with their cattle, not only for economic reasons but also they care so much about the animals. Some insisted they stay in their village with their livestock even though their safety in is danger.”

Some livestock farmers have opted to sell their animals in an attempt to save them. That’s what I call a whole lot of love for four-legged friends.

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