4 Unexpected Little Ways to Find Your Purpose

So it’s Saturday morning, you’ve just woken up — perhaps well-rested, perhaps still a bit tired from going out and having a little fun last night with your colleagues. Nonetheless, you’re ready to chill out for the next 48 hours or so because it’s finally the weekend, work has been hellish recently, and well, you deserve it. So you take a step back and try to wipe out the stress. You sink a bit more under your comforter. You plan a relaxing day ahead.

Suddenly, in the span of a split-second, the big questions come. What am I doing with my life? Is there something missing? Am I making a difference in the world like I want to? Do I even want to? Do I have any life purpose at all?

I’m sure all of us have been in this spiral at some point in our lives. Maybe you’re slowly realizing you don’t like your job. Maybe you like your job enough, yet still feel a little lost about your career path. Maybe you keep constant communication with your friends, but you’re not as fulfilled with your relationships anymore. Maybe you have hobbies, but no passions.

There can be an infinite number of reasons why any of us would question our purpose. A Google search will probably yield a thousand other posts about it already. And while it’s good to have perspective, personally I think it helps to zoom in and try not to think so big. Instead, think deeper. Look inward.

And sometimes, thinking deeper or looking inward means simply moving along with your weekend plans to take a step back and relax. Sometimes, it means doing little, ordinary things. Here are a few suggestions:

1. Read.

Remember that book you bought months ago, tucked in your shelf, and accidentally forgot about? The one you saw at the bookstore and were too eager to read? Yes, that one. Pick it up. Sit comfortably. Sip your tea.

Reading about another person’s life, whether fictional or real, might just give you insight about your own. Seeing what motivates the characters — or perhaps the historical figures or artists — in the book might help you answer questions about your motivations as well. Aside from that, reading about the great ideas that shaped the world might also inspire you to participate and do good yourself. Who knows? After all the crisis, you might even end up writing your own story someday.

2. Dress up nicely.

I know, it seems exhausting after a week of making yourself presentable in meetings or the workplace or whatever. You just want to stay on the couch in your jammies and a cozy sweater all day. But for once, won’t it be fun to dress up for yourself? Put on your Sunday’s best. Your favorite little black dress. Or experiment with a new outfit. Wear whatever makes you feel good.

And then: look. Feeling confident could be an ideal place to start your self-evaluation. It seems petty to appreciate your appearance, but appraisal of the outside could lead to a fruitful introspection. List your strengths in your head. (Or actually on paper, if you want.) Look good, feel good, and think about the best version of yourself that you want to become.

3. Do something messy.

Get those hands dirty. Try finger painting. Dig around and fix those flower beds in your garden. Lay out those baking tools, don’t be afraid to get flour all over your kitchen, and make something sweet. This way, you’ll loosen up. Minus the pressure of failure, you’ll allow yourself to explore what you can really do. It’s gonna be a good experience. At the end, when you look at your artwork, cupcakes, or dahlias, you’ll see it was worth making such a mess. Know that the same is true for the mistakes you’ll make in your life.

4. Go outside.

Literally and figuratively. Remind yourself that you’re not the only person in the world, because sometimes, finding your own life purpose means sharing your life with others. Volunteer in a community activity like fund drives or clean ups — you might just discover a passion and a vocation. Get to know your neighbors — you might see the community in a new light. Plus, don’t be afraid to help out a stranger — you just might make new friends and feel fulfilled at the same time.

If you want to learn about various ways to help people in need near your area, you can check out the BeepBeep Nation app. You can also watch this video for more information on how to get going. Helping out and perhaps finding your purpose along the way has never been this easy.

--> Help make the world a better place by sharing this story with your friends:

Let Swedish Concept “Lagom” Bring Balance to Your Life

Mindfulness is a pretty trendy lifestyle choice that truly appears to be effective, though of course different people have different takes on it. Some professionals say that living in a fast-paced world where everything is instant exhausts us, and therefore we must sometimes slow things down a bit. For a person with a mental health condition, acceptance and awareness are necessary tools in order to find ways to live with it—though again, what worked for me might not necessarily be as successful for someone else.

There are many opinions on how to find a healthy and functional lifestyle that is most suited to one’s well-being. But if there’s another word to describe this world other than “fast-paced,” I think it would be “excessive.” We work so hard to buy so much stuff, eat so much food to do so many things, take in so much information in order to survive and then so much media to keep ourselves entertained. We need so much and want so much. This is why I find myself rather invested in the balance of one’s life as described by the Swedish concept of “lagom”.

“Lagom” [celebrates] the idea of “just enough.” It’s the space between minimalism and living in excess . . . With lagom, less is more, and instead of buying things we do not need, it is about finding pleasure and fulfillment in moderation. It is the belief that extremes on the spectrum are bad. For instance, exercise is good, but none at all is just as detrimental as too much.

The idea seems exciting, though a bit lofty. So the question now would be: how does one embrace “lagom”? Well, to answer this, you would constantly have to ask another question: is this good enough? Because good enough is the way to go for “lagom”. When it comes to housekeeping, one should learn to keep what’s valuable — don’t hoard every single souvenir, but don’t toss everything out so quickly either.

[B]efore adding anything else to your space, ask yourself if things are good enough already. The point is to find a simpler life that still has room for the things that make you happy.

As for work, you have to know your limits. Decide when enough is enough. Don’t demand too much, but don’t let your employer demand too much from you either.

Accept that work is an important part of life, but find the balance between letting it be the main focus of your life and an unpleasant task you charge through as quickly as possible.

Another compartment of life that “lagom” works wonders with is your diet. This is because the idea of balance and moderation is best when it comes to nutrition.

[T]here is a time for indulging in all the delicious goodies that make a celebration great, but there is also a time to moderate. The first step to eating lagom-style is to eliminate waste.

Not every good meal has to be indulgent and expensive. Buy local. Grow your own produce. As long as it doesn’t take too big a space in your schedule, make time for things that will balance your life.

Like I said, you may read a lot of opinions about the real way to achieve a healthy lifestyle. You may hear from your momma or Aunt Carol about their own take. Then again, every person’s life is so specific, and what you end up doing with mindfulness, slowness, or even “lagom” depends entirely on how you want to live yours. “Lagom’s” only reminder is as simple as this: simple is best.

--> Help make the world a better place by sharing this story with your friends:

Woman Forgoes Cancer Treatment To Save Baby

Parents do a lot for their children and, occasionally, the children of others. This generous mom donated 5,000 pints of breastmilk to parents in need. 37-year-old Carrie Deklyen saved her baby’s life — and she didn’t even know it. Deklyen chose to forego cancer treatment in order to protect her unborn child, giving birth while in a coma.

Dekylen… discovered she was pregnant in April, just two weeks after being diagnosed with glioblastoma. She underwent two surgeries to remove the tumor and, along with her husband, Nick, chose to forego a clinical trial in order to protect the baby.

The miracle baby was born at 24 weeks and conveniently named Life. Weighing only 1 pound and 4 ounces at birth, Life has progressed immensely, according to doctors. Unfortunately, they couldn’t say the same for Dekylen.

Dekylen’s tumor was showing rapid growth, and doctors were forced to drain fluid from her brain several times. Doctors had hoped to delay delivery until 28 weeks gestation, but a decline in both Life and Dekylen’s health had forced them to act earlier.

Alongside Life, Dekylen will be survived by five other children. As proven by Dekylen, nothing compares to a mother’s love.

--> Help make the world a better place by sharing this story with your friends:

MIT Designs Dome Forest Habitat To Win Mars Contest

Preparing for life on Mars has become increasingly tedious, especially after discoveries of snow on the planet. Nevertheless, places like the UAE are eager to push forward the limits of space study, building a massive Mars metropolis. You know — just in case. But clearly, it’s MIT engineers who are coming out on top after snatching the top prize at the Mars City Design contest for their dome habitats.

MIT’s winning design, which the team calls Redwood Forest, is a collection of “tree habitats” connected through a system of tunnels called “roots.” The roots would provide safe access to other tree habitats, private spaces and “shirt-sleeve transportation,”

If the designs make it to Mars, each dome would house up to 50 inhabitants. Realistically, the ambitious tech team hopes to build 200, which guarantees 10,000 hopefuls a spot on life beyond Earth.

“On Mars, our city will physically and functionally mimic a forest, using local Martian resources such as ice and water, regolith (or soil), and sun to support life,” MIT postdoctoral researcher Valentina Sumini said.

It’s a daunting prospect, if it does happen. Hopefully MIT’s “forest” will make future residents feel right at home.

--> Help make the world a better place by sharing this story with your friends:

There’s A Possibility Of Life On Saturn’s Moon

People are always eager to learn more about space. This astronomy student even photographed it, using only a telescope and Game Boy. While it’s impressive, NASA never fails to blow us out of the water. In its final voyage, satellite Cassini discovered a possibility of life on Saturn’s moon Titan.

Using data from Cassini, the first study… documents so-called carbon chain anions—negatively charged carbon molecules that are thought to serve as a step to the formation of more complex organic molecules that can develop life.

These molecules don’t normally appear in other space environments, meaning this is big news. Also found present on Titan was vinyl cyanide, a molecule that can build cell membranes.

This molecule, if it fell into the pools of liquid hydrocarbons on Titan’s surface, could theoretically serve a role similar to that of phospholipids on Earth, which comprise the soft, but durable membranes surrounding all of our cells and their precious genetic material.

The material is toxic on Earth but would develop perfectly on Titan — just differently. Actual life on Saturn has not yet seen the light of day, but this major discovery is crucial, nonetheless. (Or should I say out of this world?)

--> Help make the world a better place by sharing this story with your friends: