Deaf Boy Raises Money For Deaf Children

When it comes to being charitable, it’s never to early to start. In fact, some benefactors can be as young as 5-years-old, like prodigy painter Cassie Gee. For this 10-year-old deaf boy, what started as a lesson in responsibility became a fundraising initiative for other deaf children.

“When my dog ate my hearing aids, I kind of learned how important it is and I kind of felt bad for the other people who might [not be able to replace theirs],” [said] Braden Baker.

Baker lost his hearing aids to family dog Chewy twice, and has since been more diligent in keeping them safe. The troublesome encounter encouraged him to set up a GoFundMe page, which raised $15,000 in a single month. Baker donated the money to Oticon Hearing Foundation.

“We could not be more thankful for his generosity and determination,” the foundation, who’s mission is to improve hearing care worldwide, said on their official Facebook page.

Because of kids like Baker, the fact that our future lies in the hands of the new generation isn’t such a scary thought.

--> Help make the world a better place by sharing this story with your friends:

The iPhone Is Also An Advanced Hearing Aid

I have to commend the hearing-impaired. While the gift of sound eludes them, they are articulate in an entirely different language (which dogs can learn, by the way). Technology is helping to close the gap between the hearing and non-hearing with translating devices. This time around, Apple is happy to help and is launching a pretty high-tech hearing aid.

Those using the system can not only get phone calls directly routed inside their skulls, but also stream music, podcasts, audio books, movie soundtracks, and even Siri—all straight to the implant.

The concept stemmed from the average deaf person’s struggle to answer phone calls. To avoid bulky, wired devices, Apple pushed Bluetooth technologies even further.

“We spent a lot of time tuning our solution to meet the requirements of the battery technology used in the hearing aids and cochlear implants.”

Apple’s system also supports a bimodal setup, in which sound can come from either an aid or implant. There is even a feature for lost implants. Most importantly, the system does not drain the iPhone’s battery, which most add-ons tend to do.

To solve the huge problem of streaming high-quality audio without quickly draining the tiny zinc batteries in hearing aids, Apple had previously developed a new technology called Bluetooth LEA, or Low Energy Audio.

Looks like another win for technology.

--> Help make the world a better place by sharing this story with your friends: