Dutch Group Builds Furniture With Canal Garbage

Nowadays, “fancy” isn’t about luxury materials and extravagant designs. Instead, lavish design is more so sustainable than it is expensive. Alternative to landfills, trash is making its way back into homes as furniture. Alongside startup Pentatonic, Dutch company Plastic Whale is turning plastic waste into chic furniture pieces.

Plastic Whale recently announced a circular furniture collection, composed of a conference room table, chairs, lamps, and acoustic panels that are all made out of PET bottles from Amsterdam’s canals.

A thousand bottles make a single high-end felt and foam-paneled table, while 50 to 60 make a chair. Considering the amount of plastic polluting bodies of water, furniture selections have ridiculous amounts of potential to grow. Even better, Plastic Whale models its furniture after marine life.

Ten percent of the profits… will be invested in local projects in other parts of the world that aim to use a similar economic model to turn plastic waste into something valuable. The resources generated from the furniture will go into more plastic fishing expeditions.

In an industry constantly on the hunt for the best textiles and constituents, trash is certainly their treasure.

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Yes, You Can Rock A Studio Apartment

When you’re fresh out of university and stripped of your toga, reality hits like a right hook. Budgeting may not be your strong suit, and neither would interior design be — unless it was your major. Still, despite the looming horrors of adulthood, sustainable wardrobe trends and forward-moving technology soften the blow. Living alone isn’t easy. Not everyone claims they can rock a studio apartment, but yes — it’s possible!

Home shopping is often exciting, especially if you’re moving into your first one. Though the funding department can often speak for itself, not everyone is particularly thoughtful when it comes to space. Photographic memory or none, measure your room dimensions. Furniture “looking small” is just about as deceiving as two-dollar fortune tellers. Know your apartment’s limits. Anyway, you do want to make sure you can push a bed frame through the door.

Once you have your basics down pat, pick out adjustable storage. Putting away your things in one place will not only be less confusing — it eats up significantly less space. Scout department stores that sell shelves that shrink and expand. That way, they’ll only cater to what you have at the moment, an amount that will likely fluctuate. Bonus points if you pick up a couch with drawers!

Smaller apartments also mean smaller rooms, if not just a single space. In this case, you’ll want pretty versatile fittings. Purchase items with several functions. Finding altering desks, couches, and even beds are surprisingly not too difficult a find. If you can hide them away after use, even better! After all, Transformers aired ten years ago. And on the plus side, your studio should, by default, feel a lot more futuristic.

Though it mostly goes without saying, buy only what is necessary. Decor is crucial to personalizing a home, but if you’re low on cash, keep it on the back burner. If you can’t afford a particular necessity, make it yourself. Get creative, especially with items that aren’t too intimate. Show off your wardrobe on a makeshift wall rack. Nowhere to keep your books? Make a shelf — out of books!

If you’re fussy about an area looking tight, play with illusion. Decorate with striped rugs to make floors appear lengthier. Paint your walls with light colors to reflect sunlight as opposed to absorbing it. Embellish your walls higher up, to give rooms a sense of height. Make things pop in however way you see fit. What catches your eye will likely catch others’ too, but avoid overcrowding! Larger and fewer ornamental pieces trump smaller and plentiful ones any day.

Most importantly, be resourceful. Your home isn’t a doomsday bunker — keep it comfortable. Figure out several ways to use a single appliance. If hitting the laundromat or local diner is a simpler option, go for it. Home will always be there to welcome you back, mansion or not.

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Connectable Plastic Bottles Are Completely Reusable

Plastic may be a landfill’s greatest enemy, but an innovator’s best tool. In the Philippines, thousands of bottles have been repurposed into lamps. Now, retired educator Steven Klein is creating connectable plastic bottles that are strong enough to build furniture.

Unlike traditional plastic bottles, Eco Connect bottles have a deeper recess in the base, so that the top of one can be readily connected to the bottom of the next, quite securely.

While a plastic bottle coffee table may not be everyone’s aesthetic, it is a thoughtful concept. Klein’s ultimate goal is to encourage bottling companies to switch to Eco Connect. Production will not require new machinery — just the connector pieces.

“An expanding variety of connector pieces, lights, and motors will become available to continue to grow the system. Also, a percentage of funds from connector purchases will be donated to water conservation programs,”

Eco Connect leaves consumers with no excuse for littering. It may not be stylish, but it sure is sustainable!

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Startup Turns Trash Into Fancy Sustainable Furniture

Since growing your own furniture became a reality, other eco-friendly furniture options have been coming to light. Startup Pentatonic is turning the contents of your daily trash bin into fancy sustainable furniture.

“Subject to what product, finish or performance we are looking for, we select trash based upon its properties and application possibilities, and then apply this technology using a number of precision manufacturing processes,”

Assembly of the pieces do not require tools — a valiant effort to eliminate toxic glues. The company is also introducing a unique “circular economy” system for customers.

“Our circular model, whereby we buy back our products from our consumers to recycle them into new products – that’s new in a design space.”

Pentatonic has put forward an incredibly smart initiative, winning over the hearts of environmentalists. The company has since raised £4.3 million in funding for its launch. Are you purchasing a trash couch? I’m certainly thinking about it.

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You Can Now Grow Your Own Furniture

Looks like Home Depot is going to see a dip in sales because homegrown furniture is now a reality. Evocative Design is offering consumers a “Grow It Yourself” initiative using mushroom-based materials. (Unfortunately, you can’t choose to eat them.)

[The kit] designed to use the same mycelium (that’s the vegetative part of a fungus) technology to give customers at home the chance to create their own projects and products.

“College design students [have] created everything from a piggybank to jewelry to a guitar. Makers have created chairs, clocks and even a wedding dress.”

For busybodies, pre-grown kits are available for no-hassle assembly. Otherwise, customers can order a bag of mushroom material to grow… well… pretty much anything.

“In nature, fungi and mushrooms are nature’s recyclers. With Ecovative’s patented Mushroom Material, we can take any regional waste stream and upcycle it into a higher value product.  At the end of that product’s life cycle, it will passively return to the earth.”

Can I build a hair dryer with this stuff?

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