Deaf Dog Rescues Lost 3-Year-Old

We all know dogs are capable of achieving amazing feats — that is just completely irrefutable. They rescue their owners from gas leaks, help calm veterans with PTSD, plant trees to restore burnt forests, track survivors of an earthquake, and even comfort anxious cheetahs.

Dogs do these awe-inspiring acts, sometimes in spite of their own disability. A partially blind and deaf dog recently became an honorary member of the police as he rescued a three-year-old girl who was lost in the Australian bush in Queensland.

Seventeen-year-old blue heeler Max stayed with the girl, named locally as Aurora, overnight and then helped lead her grandmother directly to her location after a huge search and rescue operation . . . Aurora wandered off alone on Friday afternoon and was found safe in bushland 2 kilometres from her house at around 7.30am local time on Saturday, according to ABC News.

100 volunteers were involved in the emergency search, but it was the deaf dog that eventually led to Aurora after camping with her the whole night. Queensland Police showered Max, the deaf dog, with praises and tweeted that he is now an honorary member of the police force.

[Aurora’s grandmother Leisa Marie Bennett] told ABC News: “I think [Aurora] was a bit overwhelmed by the tears and the howling, but I explained to her how happy those tears were. It could have gone any of 100 ways, but she’s here, she’s alive, she’s well and it’s a great outcome for our family.”

I swear, dogs just never run out of life-saving surprises for their human friends. And for rescuing a 3-year-old girl, Max truly deserves his yummy one-of-a-kind treat from the Queensland police.

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Ambulance Caters To Mental Illness Emergencies

As it becomes less of a stigma, mental health is finally receiving the attention it deserves. People are embracing their conditions thanks to online tools like DIY therapy and help hotlines. Notwithstanding, feeling vulnerable and ashamed remains a looming issue — one that Sweden is tackling firsthand. Countering rising suicide rates, Stockholm has introduced the world’s first mental health ambulance.

Inside the ambulance is a warm, inviting area equipped with comfortable seats instead of medical equipment, two mental health nurses and one paramedic.

The Psychiatric Emergency Response Team attends to roughly 130 calls monthly, countering 15,000 attempts annually. So far, the ambulance’s success rate has risen steadily.

“I can’t see any reason as to why the project shouldn’t continue,” [Mental Health Emergency head Fredrik] Bengtsson said. “It has been considered a huge success by police, nurses, healthcare officials, as well as by the patients.”

It sounds as though Sweden is the first to get things right. If mental illness is as urgent as physical trauma, why not treat it as such?

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Pregnant Doctor Delivers Baby Before Giving Birth

Delivering a baby is always a unique experience. You could be a preteen delivering your brother or an OB-Gyn delivering a gorilla. Regardless, the journey is always different. Pregnant doctor Amanda Hess thought she’d only be birthing her own child when she stepped out to deliver another woman’s baby.

While waiting to begin the procedures to have her labor induced, she glanced at the computer screen in her room that alerts the medical staff to patients’ conditions and noticed that an unknown woman was having complications with her pregnancy.

“I heard nurses running down the hallway,” Hess says. “I said, ‘Do you guys need some help?’”

Patient Leah Halliday-Johnson’s baby was experiencing sharp drops in her heartbeat. When Hess learned that the on-call OB-Gyn was not on duty, she immediately took action.

Dr. Hess, in practice about seven years, says occasionally women deliver a baby in the hospital when a doctor can’t make it in time and in those cases, the nurses handle the birth.

But Dr. Hess didn’t mind at all, and afterward returned to her own room and started the medication to induce her own labor.

To us, the decision may have demanded more thought — but to Dr. Hess, it was a total no-brainer.

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Apple Watch Saves Man From Car Accident

The Apple Watch, good for notifications, counting your steps and telling the time, has also saved a life, enabling student Casey Bennett to call 911 from a car wreck.

Casey Bennett was driving to his home from college when he got involved in a T-bone accident at an intersection. The car flipped multiple times before landing on its side, leaving Casey stuck to the driver’s seat… But he couldn’t reach for his phone as the interiors of his car were all messed up.

He then remembered that his Apple Watch has a special feature that could help him in the situation. So, he pressed and held the crown on his Apple Watch for six seconds and activated the emergency SOS feature.

It’s an unconventional way to sell the product to potential users, but it is effective. The watch also helped Bennett maintain a regime and diet after the accident.

Apart from the Apple Watch, many flagship Android Wear devices like the LG Watch Urbane 2 and ASUS ZenWatch 3/ ZenWatch 2 also sport this feature.

It’s time for me to look at smart watches again, and perhaps buy one this time.

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Could Drones Be Life Savers?

In times of emergency, we rely solely on human action, men or women driving ambulances through winding traffic in the hopes of tending to their patients before it’s too late. Constantly developing technology has allowed such emergency procedures to improve, and now drones are being used to transport defibrillators to people stricken by cardiac arrest.

Researchers tested the idea and found drones arrived at the scene of 18 cardiac arrests within about 5 minutes of launch. That was almost 17 minutes faster on average than ambulances – a big deal for a condition where minutes mean life or death.

The versatile drone, used primarily in capturing live videos, surveying dangerous areas, and monitoring wildlife, is now expanding its areas of expertise.

Drones are increasingly being tested or used in a variety of settings, including to deliver retail goods to consumers in remote areas, search for lost hikers and help police monitor traffic or crowds. Using them to speed medical care seemed like a logical next step.

The researchers used a small heart defibrillator weighing less than two pounds, featuring an electronic voice that gives instructions on how to use the device.

Drones are among a myriad of new machines with a great potential for saving lives. Preliminary testing of drone defibrillators is currently taking place in the Northwestern University in Chicago.

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