Diggers Discover Hundreds Of Dinosaur Eggs In China

Recent discoveries of a 1-million-year-old Stegomastodon and ancient water bird fossil are taking a backseat, thanks to an even greater finding. As luck would have it, paleontologists have hit the jackpot in Xinjiang, China with 215 pterosaur eggs. Fortunately, there are no plans to open up a real-life Jurassic Park — yet.

“When you have a really unique find, you basically can’t do anything to it because that’s all you’ve got. But now that we have literally hundreds of eggs to work with, we have more options — such as cutting different eggs into cross-sections to study growth rates.” [said paleobiologist David Unwin.]

16 of the eggs contain embryonic remains, encompassed by dozens of highly-intact skeletons. Though this particular species of pterosaur boasted an 11-foot wingspan, it technically wasn’t a dinosaur. Scientists assume pterosaurs would’ve closer resembled a giant albatross — just significantly more frightening.

“I think these new embryonic finds are really exciting because with these, we can begin to reconstruct the embryonic development of pterosaurs inside the egg. I just think it’ll take time to do that.” [said Unwin.]

With potentially 300 more surrounding eggs undiscovered, the horizons for study are limitless. Let’s just hope nobody gets any crazy ideas.

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Cryogenic Freezing Hints At Possibility Of “Immortality”

Looks like the sleeping pods in sci-fi blockbuster “Passengers” are closer to becoming a reality. If we can figure out out how to grow replacement organs, why not take a crack at immortality? While it isn’t totally possible (yet), cryogenic freezing has brought us a step closer to living forever.

Experts in the US have shown that they can preserve brains and bodies in a state of suspended animation where they freeze an individual to sub-zero temperatures and revive them at a time of choosing in the future.

Initial experiments with fish embryos used anti-freeze as a type of sealant, but wasn’t enough for full preservation. Gold nano-rods, on the other hand, saw success.

When the minuscule rods are added to the anti-freeze, lasers are shot at the frozen embryos which were frozen to -196C.

The nano-rods conduct the laser’s heat, allowing the embryos to be warmed up much quicker.

Some 10 per cent of the embryos survived and then continued to grow as normal.

Not only does the process bring us closer to, in theory, “immortality”, it will allow for long-period traveling. Paying a visit to Mars, for example, takes 6 months, while getting to Pluto takes nearly 10 years. But if space isn’t your thing, maybe you’d prefer to meet your great-great grand children.

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Designer Babies On The Way?

More perfect human beings are coming.

The first known attempt at creating genetically modified human embryos in the United States has been carried out by a team of researchers in Portland, Oregon

This is a first for America:

Until now, American scientists have watched with a combination of awe, envy, and some alarm as scientists elsewhere were first to explore the controversial practice. To date, three previous reports of editing human embryos were all published by scientists in China.

And:

In altering the DNA code of human embryos, the objective of scientists is to show that they can eradicate or correct genes that cause inherited disease, like the blood condition beta-thalassemia. The process is termed “germline engineering” because any genetically modified child would then pass the changes on to subsequent generations via their own germ cells—the egg and sperm.

I think it’s just a matter of time before modified human embryos get implanted into a womb – which will then lead to a human race free of many inherited diseases.

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