L.A. Fighting Urban Warming By Painting Streets White

Climate change is a force to be reckoned with. With the help of technology such as the carbon calculator, we can much more easily reduce our damaging footprints. However, for some communities, the change is too gradual, and acting quickly is a much preferred option. This is why Los Angeles is painting its streets white — to combat urban warming.

15 streets were covered with this asphalt-based paint-like substance to cool down the streets by about 11-13 degrees Fahrenheit and therefore cools down the buildings around them.

In sunny California, road surface temperatures can boast a whopping 130 – 140 degrees. Being able to fry an egg on the road is no longer just a myth. In fact, it’s the perfect temperature — but not for bare feet.

It might not seem like a lot, but… if 35% of LA’s streets were covered with a reflective surface like this, it would translate into a 1-degree drop in temperature throughout the city.

1 degree may seem insignificant, but it’s enough to save $100 million in energy spending. It’s a small but practical fix. Not to mention the roads are looking and feeling a lot cooler.

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Air Conditioning System Beams Heat Into Space

There is no denying that climate change is a curse — but, in a way, also a blessing. Recurring heat waves have allowed bright minds to find alternative sources of energy, making the most of traffic and laptop batteries. Now, startup SkyCool wants to help homeowners save on electricity bills with an air conditioning system that beams heat into space.

Objects on earth give off heat in the form of an invisible type of light called infrared radiation. Emissions in the mid-infrared range of eight and 13 micrometers slip through the atmosphere and into the cool lower layers of space.

SkyCool invented a material that can take advantage of this natural occurrence. The material… radiates infrared light within the eight to 13 micrometer range. It also reflects 97 percent of sunlight, which prevents sun’s warmth from offsetting the effect.

The material, which is fitted over pipes, can save buildings up to 70% off air conditioning fees. Not only is it a dream cost-wise — it can lower carbon emissions, 10% of which arise from cooling systems worldwide. Word on the street is that SkyCool will be tending to potential customers by next year. Here’s to hoping construction costs are as cool as the actual product.

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