5-Year-Old Provides Classmates With Milk Money

If we are born inherently good, we see the best of it in our kids. Thanks to technology, children of all ages have been raising funds for various causes. In just a little over a month, kids have pooled money for deaf communities and Puerto Ricans in need. In rural Michigan, another kindergartener is stepping into the charitable spotlight, raising $5,000 for her classmates’ milk funds.

Sunshine has 20 classmates, and about half can’t afford milk. Milk costs 45 cents per carton, so Sunshine would need $800 to buy her classmates milk every day for one school year.

Initially, the cheery, pigtailed 5-year-old donated $30 of piggy bank money to a friend. Impressed by her initiative, Sunshine’s grandmother Jackie Oelfke decided to help her crowdfund. Naturally, this prompted the pair to set up a GoFundMe page.

Her GoFundMe campaign has been going for ten days so far, and today it surpassed its $5,000 goal — enough to give her classmates milk money until they’re well into the fourth grade.

It seems Sunshine is filling both her classmates’ pockets and tummies!

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School Welcomes Back Young Cancer Survivor

Nothing compares to the heartbreak of a cancer diagnosis. Every year, 12.7 million people fall victim to bad news, of whom 7.6 million don’t make it. Though breakthroughs such as personalized vaccines have been gradual, nonprofits have been helping to ease the pain of chemo. And, of course, nothing beats the support of family and friends. To help recovering leukemia patient Bridget Kelly feel at home, hundreds of neighbors welcomed her back to school.

“Her classmates wanted to let her know, ‘You were out for 15 months, but we absolutely did not forget about you,” [said] Kristin Healy, a school parent who helped organize the gathering.

The 8-year-old, diagnosed with lymphoblastic leukemia in 2016, underwent chemotherapy for 88 days. Bridget’s then-3-year-old sister acted as donor for her stem cell transplant. For over a year, the bright second-grader caught up with studies at home. The massive welcoming committee was more than well-deserved.

“It was almost overwhelming,” Bridget’s mother, Megan Kelley [said]… “She felt so special and so welcomed after such a long and hard road.”

Understandably, surviving the trying condition is every patient’s ultimate goal. Life is just a little less bitter with a hand to hold.

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