Business Networking: BeepBeep Nation and Intangible Profit

I’ve been in the game for a while now. In the world of business, it’s not enough to be efficient, effective, and generally adept at your tasks. What’s more important than the mechanical side of whatever industry is securing good relationships and establishing a broad network of contacts. Dealing with administrative and operational matters should not overshadow putting yourself and your company out there and meeting great people.

There are some traditional means of business networking. Setting up events to gather potential clients and affiliates is always on the table — there is always an opportune time for a semi-casual party, a formal program to an organization you want to sponsor, an official launch of a new product, or others. Attending trade shows and business conferences is also very conducive to building a network; whether as an attendee or a speaker, you’ll get the chance to meet people and stimulate their interests.

In these areas, making a good impression is of utmost priority. Hard selling one’s business may not always be the most effective approach. Sometimes, keeping the conversation light, fun, but engaging may be even more beneficial. This is your one shot at establishing a connection, so actually getting to know a few great prospects is better than having a standard robotic speech for everyone. Aggressive methods are also not recommended as you do not want to scare away your prospects.

Talking about your passions and listening to them talk about their passions is a good step to ensuring a followup sometime soon. Remembering the humanity of the people that you’re talking to while talking to them leads to more fulfilling, more secure relationships in the future. This is true for both our professional and personal lives.

Of course, in the digital age, there are updated ways of achieving the same goal. Social media sites such as LinkedIn, Twitter, and other online communities are a good way to promote your business and establish a more secure network of potential clients and affiliates. Nowadays, it’s actually unusual for any business not to have its own website or blog to express its philosophy, share its take on relevant industry issues, provide information requisite to the business, and enable interactions with its current audience and eventual prospects.

Being in business also means committing to things that do not instantly scream profit! at your face. It may feel counterintuitive at times to do things for free, especially in a world where it’s easier to look only at price tags and consider nothing else. But profit isn’t always immediately tangible in business networking.

Sometimes, a long-lasting excellent reputation is worth way more than an instant sell. Offering your help and expertise to people who seem to have issues that you can address might be mutually favorable. Again, while you don’t want to be aggressive, taking the initiative is a good habit. Not only are there possibilities of people eagerly returning favors some other time, helping out may eventually lead to your reputation as a generous person.

To this end, it’s also good to look for opportunities to volunteer your time. Business networking doesn’t require your focus to solely be on your own business; venturing into other fields can actually give you an even broader network. Volunteering in the community gets you in touch with other groups of people who may not seem relevant at first, but could prove helpful in the future.

Inculcating this in yourself will make you appreciate the value of everyone you meet and inspire you to get to know even more people in a deeper way.

One such app that aims to facilitate these connections and encourage people to have fulfilling face-to-face social interactions is BeepBeep Nation. By providing a platform for requestors to get any kind of help they need and for helpers to offer their capacity to help out, what BeepBeep Nation wants is to create a helping economy that will be beneficial for all of its users.

It may seem a little strange to lend a hand without getting anything in return, but as I’ve illustrated regarding business networking, what it provides you is more long-term yield. Simply giving someone a ride or a place to stay for the night is already a huge investment. BeepBeep Nation offers a plethora of these opportunities: aside from a ride or a place to stay, you can assist in medical emergencies and vehicle breakdowns, you may merely give accurate information regarding the restaurant your requestor wants to check out, and other forms of help.

You never know, the person you gave a recommendation for a quaint local café might just be your next great business partner.

Go to the BeepBeep Nation website to find out how to get started. Fuelled by the EMINENT token, BeepBeep Nation is set to launch soon worldwide, starting in selected cities. The EMINENT token pre-sale is currently live, with great bonuses available. Check it out now, and don’t hesitate to participate in a world of change.

--> Help make the world a better place by sharing this story with your friends:

The Real History Behind Mother’s Day

Time and time again, a mother proves herself to be a great blessing to those around her. Sometimes, it takes a lot of sacrifice, as shown to us by a mother who chose to forgo cancer treatment to save her baby. Sometimes, it can be in the seemingly little things, like this mom’s viral post on social media promoting depression awareness.

Other times, a mother shares her kindness to people not even her real children, as in the case of this woman donating 5,000 pints of breast milk to gay couples and parents of premature babies, this woman adopting her former student who has been in the foster system since he was nine, or even this group of stay-at-home female doctors providing online consultations to the poor.

Mother’s Day is a tribute to people like them, for sure. But beyond the flowers, fancy gifts in pastel wrapping paper, and delightful brunches, the real history behind the holiday has a lot more to do with peace activism and anti-war sentiments.

A woman named Anna Jarvis started a campaign for an official holiday honoring mothers in 1905, the year her own mother died . . . Over the next few years, Jarvis pushed to have the holiday officially recognized . . . Finally, in 1914, President Woodrow Wilson signed a proclamation making Mother’s Day an official holiday, to take place the second Sunday of May.

Anna Jarvis put Mother’s Day on the calendar as a day dedicated to expressing love and gratitude to mothers, acknowledging the sacrifices women make for their children.

If you’ve ever experienced confusion on where the apostrophe falls, don’t worry. I think all of us have. However, even in the 1900s, Anna Jarvis was determined to make it a singular possessive, with the apostrophe coming before the s. She believed that each mother in each family has to be recognized, and so, each mother deserves to feel like it’s her own day.

But again, like I’ve teased earlier, the history of Mother’s Day has even deeper roots. Where did Anna Jarvis get the idea to push for her agenda? That’s right — the answer, of course, is her own mom.

[Ann Reeves Jarvis] played an important role uniting women for good causes. [She] cared for wounded soldiers on both sides of the field during the Civil War, and in its aftermath she organized a “Mothers’ Friendship Day,” the goal of which was to foster reconciliation between former Union and Confederate soldiers by having them come together, along with mothers from both sides.

In an attempt to stop the violence brought upon by the American Civil War, Ann Reeves Jarvis wanted to rally mothers. Her entire life was spent promoting peace and childcare, especially in the midst of war. No wonder her daughter wanted to pay tribute to motherhood.

Years later, daughter Anna Jarvis lobbied against the commercialization of the holiday. She thought that the whole point of Mother’s Day was defeated by how florists, card-makers, and other businesses profit so much from it. And I agree, though I won’t protest the existence of the holiday itself. This Mother’s Day, we might want to look beyond the fancy-shmancy stuff in shops and restaurants. Perhaps we might also want to recognize the day’s roots in women’s activism, and celebrate some recent gender milestones.

Then again, I think it’s okay to spoil your mom just a little. After all, we should remember where the apostrophe falls. This Mother’s Day, it’s okay to get your mom carnations if she loves them. It’s okay to have afternoon tea with pretty pastries. Just don’t forget what this day really is about: her.

--> Help make the world a better place by sharing this story with your friends:

Taco Bell’s Education Support to 210,000 Employees

As individuals, we can all act even in little ways to alleviate the condition of people who do not have the same resources as ourselves, like perhaps helping underprivileged kids gain opportunities through donations or planned skill-training sessions. However, it is undeniable that more action from institutions is necessary for greater societal change. States like New York and Los Angeles have been responding to this truth through community projects such as providing free lunches to hundreds of thousands of children and making library books accessible to low-income families.

A groundbreaking move on the corporate side has come from a famous fast food chain as Taco Bell helps all 210,000 of its employees towards educational opportunities.

On March 15, Taco Bell announced that employees at the chain’s 7,000 stores nationwide are eligible for education classes at 80 online universities, as well as tuition assistance and college credit for job training at the restaurant.

Other chains such as McDonald’s and Starbucks also offer support to some employees through programs like this. Employees with a high school degree or less need the above-mentioned benefits to have better career prospects in the future.

“When we surveyed our employees, education support was one of the top three things they asked for,” Frank Tucker, global chief people officer at Taco Bell, said in a statement. “The barriers to achieving their education goals were time, money and support.”

Beyond this, the program also seems to be mutually beneficial to Taco Bell and its employees, as 98% of the people who participated in the pilot batch stayed in the company for more than six months. It’s a win-win situation for now, with even larger potential in the long run.

--> Help make the world a better place by sharing this story with your friends: