Biodegradable Six-Pack Beer Holders Are A New Fad

At present, contemporary breweries have moved out of beer houses and into labs. To make up for scant resources, many sustainable groups are crafting tasty drinks from bread and other waste. While revamping recipes is a success in itself, we can’t yet say the same for packaging. Six-pack holders are often 100% plastic, but that isn’t the case for Mexican Startup E6PR. Eco Six Pack Rings’ holders are made with compostable materials that are completely biodegradable.

“With the help of E6PR, we would like to inspire the entire beer industry to follow our lead… Our goal is to transition all of the packaging in our facility to this six-pack ring alternative that goes beyond recycling and strives to achieve zero waste.” [said Chris Gove of SaltWater Brewery.]

The rings dissolve in water and are safe for marine animals to ingest. E6PR hopes to produce the holders for all types of cans and bottles along with their standard size.

“If most craft brewers and big beer companies implement this technology, we will potentially be saving hundreds of thousands of marine lives as a result,” said Francisco García, the engineer behind the project

It’s quite the genius party trick, and while it won’t harm any animals, we do hope you reach for a rubbish bin before making the ocean yours.

--> Help make the world a better place by sharing this story with your friends:

Brewery Waste Can Grow Yeast For Beer Making

If there is one habit that pub regulars can’t seem to kick, it’s cracking open a cold one. Now that beers are becoming healthier, it seems no one has a reason to quit the drinking game. In fact, scientists in Singapore are experimenting with using brewery waste to grow beer yeast.

In beer making, yeast is the key ingredient for fermentation, a process where sugars from the grains are converted into alcohol. The beer brewing process thus needs large amounts of yeast.

Spent grain amounts to as much as 85 per cent of a brewery’s waste. This is of little value, so the discarded grain is often used as compost or for animal feed.

But it looks like potbellies will have to feed on something else in the meantime. Professor William Chen of Nanyang Tech has developed a conversion process that turns brewery waste into a valuable liquid nutrient.

“About 85 per cent of the waste in brewing beer can now be turned into a valuable resource, helping breweries to reduce waste and production cost while becoming more self-sustainable.”

I guess it’s safe to say that in the brewery world, nothing goes to waste.

--> Help make the world a better place by sharing this story with your friends:

Sustainable Bar Serves Tasty, Low-Impact Cocktails

For some, chocolate is the cure to a broken heart. For me, it’s a cold brew. With news of a probiotic “healthy” beer in the making, I couldn’t imagine anything better — until Trash Tiki. The sustainable pop-up bar serves tasty, low-impact cocktails made with food waste. Spearheading the project are Kelsey Ramage and Iain Griffiths.

The duo’s website features a recipe for citrus stock that makes use of already-juiced fruit, to address the fact that “citrus is once again front and centre, this time as it is by far the biggest waste product of any craft cocktail bar.”

Trash Tiki also hosts industry seminars that are open to the public — conveniently dubbed Trash Talks. The bartending twosome are among the first of their kind, stating that waste reduction is a priority mostly in restaurants.

“Perhaps surprisingly, (zero/anti-waste) isn’t really an idea that has infiltrated the bar scene that much — certainly not as much as the rest of restaurants, like it does in kitchens,”

Making the drinks are often hours-long ordeals. But if it’s doing a service to the planet (and my liver), then perhaps worth the wait.

--> Help make the world a better place by sharing this story with your friends:

Toast Ale Craft Beer Is Made From Wasted Bread

If there is a better, cleaner, and faster way to make something, it’s probably the way to go. Synthetic wine is proving just that. The process uses no grapes but it just as tasty as any Sauvignon. Now, the brewing industry is following suit with Toast Ale craft beer, made from wasted bread.

Since Toast Ale launched in the U.K. in 2016, it has saved a total of 11 tons of bread from becoming trash there. In July 2017, Toast Ale expanded to the United States… By this time next year… Toast Ale will be saving 907 kilograms of bread a month in New York City alone, nearly 12 tons a year.

While the process may sound unusual, it has actually been common practice for some 7,000 years. Toast Ale works with existing breweries to avoid the hassle of building an entirely new facility. Also, the bread they work with is far from bad — so why have they been discarded?

Supermarkets demand that produce look a certain way, forcing suppliers to throw out perfectly good produce. Because the cost falls on the supplier, supermarkets are not incentivized to help reduce waste.

While I am throwing said markets some serious side eye, it’s businesses like Toast Ale that make living sustainably dough-able.

--> Help make the world a better place by sharing this story with your friends:

Beer Can Now Make You Healthier

If you’re planning to lose your beer belly, you may want to think twice. This probiotic beer might change the game.

Researchers at the National University of Singapore recently announced that they’ve created a new beer infused with probiotics, or the sort of “good” bacteria that’s been shown to promote digestion and various other bodily functions.

The recipe, which took nine months to perfect, contains 3.5% alcohol. It undergoes an alternative fermentation process and contains a probiotic strain that regulates the immune system.

There’s been a huge increase in interest in probiotics lately with more and more people consuming things like fermented vegetables, yogurts, and kombucha.

Clearly, probiotics are becoming quite the fad. While we’re all dying to know when this new brew is hitting shelves, we can rest easy knowing the recipe has been patented.

Perhaps a cheers to this Singaporean group of geniuses?

--> Help make the world a better place by sharing this story with your friends:

Have A Drink At The UK’s Only Pub And Zoo

I have grown up with zoos. I was the first in my class to see a panda which, according to my first-grade teacher, is the world’s most useless animal. Zoos were easily my go-to when my parents suggested a trip out of town. I have spent birthdays with apes, celebrated good grades with camels, and graduated with giraffes. As an adult, while my fondness of zoos has remained, I’d prefer to stare at zebras with a glass of wine in hand. At the Fenn Bell Inn in the U.K., you can do just that!

The pub zoo, in St Mary Hoo, Kent, is the brainchild of landlord and animal lover Andy Cowell.

Mr Cowell took over the pub in 2014 and housed his collection of exotic animals in the garden.

Now he has opened his zoo to the public, who will be able to see four different breeds of monkeys, genets (an African wild cat), meerkats, lemurs, birds of prey, raccoons and South American coatis.

While many of the animals at Fenn Bell, who are rejected from various keepers, are given a second shot at a comfortable life, keeping them doesn’t come cheap. Weekly upkeep hits around £700–or 233 pints of beer!

So what are you waiting for? Book a trip and treat yourself to a pint of draft beer. After all, you’d probably be paying for a parrot’s next meal!

--> Help make the world a better place by sharing this story with your friends: