Surgeons Save Music Teacher’s Music Function

2017 has been a year of breakthroughs in medicine. From 3D printing brain tissue to the accidental discovery of origami organs, it’s been smooth sailing for the science world. A group of doctors from the University of Rochester Medical Center saved not only a music teacher’s life, but also his music function.

“Removing a tumor from the brain can have significant consequences depending upon its location. Both the tumor itself and the operation to remove it can damage tissue and disrupt communication between different parts of the brain.  It is, therefore, critical to understand as much as you can about each individual patient.”

Substitute music teacher Dan Fabbio was suffering from a tumor near the center of his brain. Neurosurgeons used a brain mapping program to treat Fabbio and studied the patient for six months. In order to ensure that the operation was a success, Fabbio played his saxophone directly after surgery.

“It made you want to cry. He played it flawlessly and when he finished the entire operating room erupted in applause.”

While my saxophone-playing skills may be parallel to that of a squealing pig, it’s good to know that this musical genius got to retain his.

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