BeepBeep Nation and Your Dynamic Beep Network of Helpers

Soon to launch is BeepBeep Nation — an app that will offer opportunities for people to request whatever kind of help and others to respond to them. You can get a ride home, read restaurant recommendations, even have a tour guide with just one beep. But what’s underneath this seemingly common service of BeepBeep Nation is a greater mission.

It aims to make the world a better place by fostering a culture of kindness and encouraging face-to-face interaction. By helping others, you get to broaden your circle of peers, build a stronger business network, or even just have nonchalant but interesting conversations every now and then.

As a true social app, BeepBeep Nation requires both requestors and helpers to meet in person when resolving a problem.  Social media has inadvertently made human relationships take a colder, digital turn. Even though it still very much utilizes digital technology, the BeepBeep Nation app harnesses that in order to promote more profound social interactions again. But how exactly does it do that?

Of course, as a social app, the BeepBeep Nation app also has its own way of building an individual’s network for him. However, unlike Facebook or Twitter, it does not ask you to make people your “friends” or “followers.” What it does is provide you with a bigger pool of potential requestors and helpers (i.e. potential peers and business contacts) through its very own Dynamic Beep Network of Helpers (DBN). By not offering the same “friends,” “followers,” or “connections” mechanics, it actually provides its users a more dynamic alternative.

Everyone — yes, everyone! — within a 1-5 mile radius of wherever you are is included in your network. All people need to do is install the BeepBeep Nation app on their smartphones, and they’re good to go. No need for “friend” or “follower” requests. Everyone is that easy to reach.

Another interesting thing about your Dynamic Beep Network Of Helpers (DBN) is that it can be composed of different people every time. Say you are travelling from your hometown of Vancouver to attend a conference in Toronto. Your DBN will change so that you have a different pool of potential acquaintances in Toronto from your DBN in Vancouver. Of course, so that people nearby can help you with your needs or you can help people nearby with theirs, the BeepBeep Nation app will connect you to people in the location you yourself specify at any given time. Amazing.

What’s even more amazing is this implication: a constantly changing DBN means having an endless number of opportunities to get help and give help. Having a previously established or curated network of “friends” and “followers” could set your limits — not just with the help you might acquire, but also the potential peers you may still want to get to know. For instance, you only look for people you want to meet in your own circles; you then scan their profiles if you have mutuals. But your DBN always provides you with new possibilities.

After all, BeepBeep Nation’s mission to make the world a better place starts with an individual helping another person out and getting to know him face-to-face. Its feature of giving users a Dynamic Beep Network Of Helpers (DBN) sincerely embodies that mission. If you’re interested in participating and creating a world of kindness, soon to launch is the BeepBeep Nation app. Its fuel, the EMINENT (EMN) token, is already available for sale. Check it out now!

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Personal Safety in the Age of Digital Technology

Having Internet access every minute of every day helps us do many tasks of varying difficulty more efficiently. We no longer even process its presence because it’s just so integrated into our lives: we just chat with our friends anytime, send out work e-mails all day, search for quick info or entertainment, go shopping conveniently, and many others. The perks of being online basically comprise our lifestyles, without us having to really think about our cyber involvement. Once we do, however, an important question arises: how can I ensure my personal safety while availing everything that being online has to offer me?

The issue of personal safety on the Internet takes many forms. These include safeguarding one’s privacy and personal information, avoiding identity theft, watching out for malware, detecting fraud and various scams, even staying away from predators and/or cyberbullies. This means that our many conveniences should always come with a certain level of vigilance.

One of the easiest and most obvious things to do is be smart with passwords. For your accounts, creating passwords that are hard to decipher is the first step, but not the only one. It also helps to have different ones for different sites, and to change all of them every once in a while. Then again, passwords aren’t enough to ensure the security of your accounts.

Having great passwords doesn’t mean we can do whatever we want with our profiles and such. Be very aware of what you share online. Of course, it’s a lot of fun to post photos on social media, but you also have to consider: what info about me can people online infer from these photos? Is my home address shown to the general public, or just my friends? From religious affiliations to current employers, it’s also sometimes tempting and seemingly necessary to exhibit many details about yourself on certain sites and apps, but think carefully about which ones you put on your profile.

Watch out for sites that ask for your bank accounts or Social Security number. Of course, it’s unavoidable to enter your credit card details when shopping online, but do the necessary background checks on the stores or whatever other sites you’re giving your information to. Identity theft is a prevailing problem on the Internet, and knowing which sites or apps are reputable should help a lot.

Lastly, the Internet provides many avenues for us to meet other people. To keep these interactions safe and enjoyable, we also need measures to ensure our personal safety. Users sometimes fake their identities (called catfishing) in order to have people send them money, lure others out in real life, prey on children, and lots of scary stuff. Some basic tips when arranging to meet in person: make sure to have the meetup in a public place and tell a family member or a friend about it.

The BeepBeep Nation app has its own mechanisms to help with its users’ personal safety. As the app encourages people to help each other out by meeting and interacting in person, it’s very important to know just how safe you are when using it. Fuelled by the EMINENT (EMN) token, BeepBeep Nation’s payment methods are cashless and therefore more secure for you. Because the app has a built-in e-wallet that stores EMN, you don’t have to enter your bank details with every encounter. Payments are carried out with just one tap. The EMN is an ERC20 token, processed in the Ethereum blockchain platform, which makes for faster and safer transactions.

Aside form this, the app itself has other features. Both people who request for help (requestors) and people who can offer help (helpers) can put a profile photo, which will aid in recognizing each other during the meetup. Real requestors and helpers should have no reason to hide their appearance. Below their profile photo, all users also have a green bar with a score of 1 to 10 called a Beep Rank. After a meetup, requestors and helpers can rate and even comment on each other. The Beep Rank takes into account these ratings and other important factors about a user’s previous help history.

Requestors and helpers are also encouraged to take a Beepie with each other. A Beepie is sort of like a selfie with the two of you or more, and it will be taken on the spot during the meetup for help. By uploading Beepies as evidence of previous help transactions, it assists other users to identify which requestors or helpers can be trusted. There is also a Chat feature to converse with your prospective requestor or helper, which you can use to verify some information before you proceed with the meetup.

Ultimately, BeepBeep Nation’s goal is to create a helping economy in which people willingly help each other out in many different ways. Because the personal safety of its users is paramount to the app in achieving this goal, BeepBeep Nation also provides them with practical measures. It’s up to the individuals as well to use the potential of these safety features wisely.

BeepBeep Nation will launch soon in selected cities worldwide. Make sure to check out the EMINENT token sale, now available!

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Info Influx: Get the Most Accurate Information through BeepBeep Nation

The Internet provides many answers to any one question that we have, guaranteed 24/7. Sometimes, however, it happens to provide too many. Sifting through all 14 pages of a Google search for a simple keyword can sometimes feel like too much effort, especially if you’re in a hurry and need the most accurate information as soon as possible. Though of course it’s helpful to have extensive research, there are instances when we simply do not have the energy and time for it.

Our brains need shortcuts. In psychology, these mental shortcuts are called heuristics. Heuristics help us make sense of the world in an efficient way, so we can take a practical course of action. Everywhere we look, there is a piece of information to be taken in, but our brains can only process so much. If we analyze every single thing, then we would never make a decision or deal with a particular situation. And everyday of our lives, we need to make hundreds or thousands of little decisions. This is why our mental shortcuts can help us make quick yet good choices.

Since we now have access to the Internet and the influx of data within it, how do we begin to streamline our decision-making? One app that can provide us with digital shortcuts is BeepBeep Nation. By connecting people who need help and others who can provide that help, it offers cheap and easy solutions to its users daily problems, including how to get the most accurate information efficiently. A requestor just needs to send out a beep asking a certain question, and he can get the freshest answers from several helpers in a few minutes.

The whole process takes a total of three convenient steps. First, you have to specify a location for your question. It might be where you are at the moment or somewhere else that’s relevant to the information you’re asking for, like a place you’re soon visiting and need some details about. Second, you have to type your question. It should help to be as concise and precise as possible. And lastly, tap the Beep button. Afterwards, waiting for helpers to respond shouldn’t take that long.

How do we know that we’re getting accurate information? Say perhaps you beep this question: “Which is the best dessert place in New York?” The helpers that will give their answers are real people located in New York. The information isn’t previously stored in some review site or search engine, so the answers you will get are real-time.

This feature is most useful when you beep a question that might have variable answers, depending on the time of day. For instance, you beep this: “Is the Tim Hortons at Robson Street open now?” Whether today’s a Monday or a Saturday, and whether it’s currently 7.a.m. or 11 p.m., will all affect what the correct response is. Since review sites or search engines give you data previously processed and stored by computers, the real-time answers you get might differ. On-the-spot responses provided by BeepBeep Nation may be a tad more helpful, as they come from people who are actually in the area and who can physically check if that Tim Hortons branch is indeed open on your behalf.

BeepBeep Nation also has ways to assist you in figuring out which helpers can provide the most accurate information. Users of the app have a green bar below their profile photo called Beep Rank, and it tells how much help they have previously given in the past, as well as how good the help was. A tip for getting the most accurate information from BeepBeep Nation: once you have enough responses, count them. The more people recommend the same place, the higher the chance it is what you’re looking for. Tallying can help you check the reliability of the information.

So nowadays, whether you’re looking for a chill and cozy place to take your date out or wondering if your favorite kind of cheese is currently available at Whole Foods, you no longer have to spend a ridiculous amount of time poring over your search results.

BeepBeep Nation has made the acquiring of the most accurate information as efficient as possible. The BeepBeep Nation app is set to launch soon in selected cities worldwide. Created for BeepBeep Nation users, the EMINENT (EMN) token fuels the app. Pre-sale of the ICO is currently live, plus cool bonuses. Check it out now!

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Technology Doesn’t Have to Make Us Less Human

Recently, I featured the EMINENT (EMN) token — a token that would get us all started on creating kindness in the world — in an article that talks about how technology and compassion could meet. To be honest, what fascinates me about technology is not just how it makes things convenient and efficient for our daily lives, not just how it gives us so much information and immediate access to everything in the blink of an eye, but also how it could improve our humanity.

I know it seems like a paradox. Facing a computer or phone screen all day could surely make you less human, right? My mom likes to say that we are all slowly becoming less human and more robot in this day and age. But I beg to disagree. So for this one, I will list down some of my favorite apps and how their functions actually encourage, promote, and deepen our sense of humanity.

1. Seek

We’ve all probably seen movies or read books that describe a technological dystopia as a world less human, dominated by robots, androids, cyborgs and other metal stuff. No more organic or natural. Everything is machine. But what’s so interesting about Seek, an app developed by iNaturalist.org, is that it shows the very opposite side of technology.

iNaturalist.org is a virtual community of nature lovers where people share information on nature-related projects in their respective cities, post observations of animals and plants around them, and contribute to archives of scientific data. The app Seek offers the same thing, except gamified. It “encourages outdoor exploration and learning by harnessing image recognition technology” where you could earn badges as you capture photos of more species and learn cool trivia about them afterwards.

Now who’s to say technology will take us away from nature?

2. DailyArt

My mom also likes to complain that today’s generation doesn’t know how to appreciate culture the way previous generations did. The pleasure of reading is reduced to clickbait. Our passions all just revolve around video games and social media. Even our music sounds electronic. There might be truth to those statements, but again, I don’t think it’s necessarily the case.

DailyArt is a good testament. By providing a daily dose of art history, it inspires a whole new generation of prospective artists and art critics through technology. It features one classic masterpiece everyday (you can make it part of your morning routine), loads and loads of fascinating stories about painters and their paintings, and even create your own gallery of your favorite ones. Plus, you can also share them to your friends on social media.

Point is, being very invested in online participation doesn’t really have to distance us from human pursuits such as art. Sometimes, we can even improve our skills and interests through virtual means.

3. Calm

Awarded by Apple as 2017’s App of the Year, Calm offers meditation techniques for sleep, relaxation, and stress reduction. It teaches you how to be mindful and release anxiety, reflect your emotions, be in touch with your body and your senses, relax your muscles, and many other methods.

Contrary to popular belief, technology doesn’t always bombard us with excessive activity or push us into being crazy busy; sometimes it also provides us avenues for feeling rejuvenated and refreshed.

4. BeepBeep Nation

Soon to launch, the BeepBeep Nation app will offer people opportunities to get help and give help to others in need. With just one beep, you can request for whatever type of help such as getting a ride home or reading restaurant recommendations. Underneath that function, however, what BeepBeep Nation really aims to do is make the world a better place by encouraging face-to-face social interactions and a strong culture of kindness. By helping others, you get to meet new people and widen your circle of friends, or even just have a healthy, engaging conversation.

Again, who’s to say technology will keep us apart and make us less human? It might just bring us closer together.

Some apps nurture and promote human interests such as love for nature or the arts. Other apps help us towards reflection and introspection, letting us deeper into ourselves. Others can even help us build personal relationships with others, and not only on a virtual level, but face-to-face.

A lot of these apps, though only made possible through technology, surpass our preconceived ideas of a digital future. Rather than decrease our humanity, technology might even have the ability to make us feel even more human.

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The EMINENT token: Your Token to Creating Kindness

Today, it’s almost impossible to imagine a world where progress isn’t defined by how far we’ve come along with technology. It’s simply true that gigantic technological developments such as the Internet and its plethora of facets have given us convenience in ways that previous generations of people have only begun to imagine.

It’s undeniable that in a huge way, the Internet shapes the way our global economies and political landscapes are evolving. However, in small ways, it also shapes how people interact with each other now. Insofar as technology sometimes gets in the way of real face-to-face social interactions, it also has the enormous potential of improving our relationships.

The BeepBeep Nation app wants to utilize that potential in its mission of making the world a better place. By providing a platform to connect a person who needs help (requestor) and a help provider (helper), it promotes and encourages a helping economy. With this, every kind of help is always just one beep away. Simply put, the app offers the means towards sharing our lives to others and creating kindness in the world.

And how do we get started? A token especially made to fuel the BeepBeep Nation app will be launched soon, and it will be our token to creating kindness and experiencing human interaction on a whole new level of warmth. The EMINENT (EMN) token will be used by requestors to pay for their help requests called Beeps or to give Gratitude Tips to their helpers, though the latter is not required. After all, the goal is to build this helping economy on the willingness of people to help out.

Cashless, seamless, and convenient for users, the EMINENT (EMN) token fuels the BeepBeep Nation app and enables people to be more compassionate in a truly efficient and effective way. With just the push of a button, you can easily ask for help from people nearby or easily offer help to those who need it. By constantly giving people opportunities to help out,  wherever they may be and whatever kind of help is needed, the EMINENT token will ultimately fuel a culture of kindness. By joining the mission of creating kindness in the world, people will be able to lead more fulfilled, meaningful lives.

The word”EMINENT,” if used in the context of a person, means “respected”; and as an attribute of a person, it represents a positive quality that is noticeable. EMINENT is what BeepBeep Nation users should aspire to be when they use the app. And it might only take a little effort to get going on creating kindness and being eminent, yet the results might be huge. After all, through the EMINENT token and the BeepBeep Nation app, we could see a future where kindness is shared everyday, human-to-human. A future where the world functions on both technology and compassion.

I’m sure all of us have reasons to help people in need. They might include these: being able to make new friends or business contacts, getting to have a truly engaging conversation with someone, feeling good about doing something good, and most importantly, participating in an inspiring mission of planting seeds of compassion in the world. So don’t be afraid to contribute to this helping economy soon, for yourself and for others.

Creating kindness through the EMINENT (EMN) token is not only convenient, it might just make big waves of change. Truly, with just one Beep, you could make the world a better place. ICO coming soon!

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The Science of Gratitude (or Why It’s So Healthy to Say Thanks)

When I was a kid, my parents taught me what they call “magic words.” This includes saying please, I’m sorry, and most importantly, thank you. Vague memories of preschool also have a similar lesson; I remember my playmates and I practicing that habit as encouraged by our awesome teacher Mrs. Silverstone. When Nick lets you borrow his toy truck, say thank you. When Amy shares her fruit bites, say thank you. When Karl and Jessica make you join in their game involving color blocks, say thank you.

I myself don’t have a kid yet, but I’m pretty sure I’ll definitely teach my son or daughter the same thing. Especially after reading stuff here and there proving that something like it really exists — the science of gratitude.

In a research study involving around 300 adults who sought psychological counselling services at a university, it has been found that feelings of gratitude do not only help well-adjusted individuals, but also those who had mental health concerns. The participants — most of whom reported clinically low levels of mental health, and struggled with depression and anxiety — were divided into three groups. Although all three groups received counselling services, Group 1 was additionally asked to write one letter of gratitude every week. Group 2 was asked to write about their deepest negative thoughts and feelings. Group 3 didn’t do any writing.

Those who wrote gratitude letters reported significantly better mental health four weeks and 12 weeks after the writing exercise ended. The researchers then decided to delve into the more physical science of gratitude  and found out that their gratitude exercise had actual lasting effects on the brain. Using an fMRI scanner to analyze how the participants’ brains were processing information, the researchers asked Group 1 (gratitude letter writers) and Group 3 (people who didn’t write) to do “pay-it-forward” tasks. They were to be given money by a benefactor, and they can decide how much of it they were going to give back to a cause of their choice.

The researchers found out that across participants, the brain activity of people who felt grateful and the brain activity of people who felt mostly guilty and obligated to do the task were very distinct. When grateful people donated more, their medial prefrontal cortex became more sensitive. This is a part of the brain associated with learning and decision-making. Interestingly, this higher sensitivity was also more identified in the group who were gratitude letter writers in the previous experiment.

Other studies involving the science of gratitude also yielded fascinating results. It has been linked to better quality of sleep, as well as decreased blood pressure. And in seeming accordance with the neurological findings of the study I described a while ago, gratitude has been linked to a boost in willpower and impulse control, helping people make better decisions like avoiding overeating, exercising more and attending regular checkups.

So don’t be afraid to need help. What’s important is to remember to feel grateful and to express it to the people who are there for you.

If you want to read more about the science of gratitude, here’s a link to various research projects. If you want to participate in a cause that encourages people to get help and feel grateful, check out the BeepBeep Nation App. It provides a platform for people to request for the help they need (called requestors) and for other people to respond (called helpers).

Once the task is done, requestors may give a gratitude tip to their helpers. However, it’s not mandatory, because as we have seen scientifically, gratitude is so much more real if it’s willingly felt and reciprocated. Of course, requestors themselves may also want to be helpers to somebody else if they want to pay it forward. Visit this article to know more about BeepBeep Nation’s take on motivation and gratitude.

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The Science of Compassion (or Why It’s Really Human to Help Out)

Everyday, a plethora of stories arise on the Internet. A huge part of the content is probably fun, entertaining, and/or informational. Some, however, tell the tragedy of the world we live in. And if you read the news, you know that it’s so real. Other stories tell how people address that tragedy and do their share in alleviating the suffering of their fellow human beings. In our blog, we frequently showcase this kind of content — stories of people with exemplary acts of devotion and compassion or even people who do random little acts of kindness in their everyday lives.

Some people who enjoy helping out tend to do so for religious or spiritual reasons. And whether it’s Buddhism, Christianity, Islam, or others, the religions of the world do have discourses of compassion. Though I myself have always been curious about a different but equally important aspect of this human tendency: is there a science behind this?

I’m glad to report: yep, there is. A study done by experimental social psychologists tested how the experience of compassion affected people’s behavior. First, participants were told that they were supposedly part of an experiment about mathematical ability and taste perception. Ostensibly, these were the instructions: participants were supposed to solve as much as they can of 20 math problems, in which they would receive 50 cents for each problem they solved correctly. After being checked and getting paid, they would proceed to the taste perception phase. Here, participants were asked to prepare taste samples for each other by pouring extra-hot hot sauce.

It seems absurd, but here’s the catch. The experimenters hired confederates to pretend to be fake participants. Let’s call the first one Dan and the second Hannah. In one version of the experiment, Dan was asked to cheat badly and very obviously on the math problems, so that the real participants would see. Afterwards, in the taste perception phase, the experimenters noticed that the real participants poured bigger servings of hot sauce to Dan the Cheater. But doesn’t this show revenge instead of compassion?

Well, in another version, Dan the Cheater was asked to do the same thing but now Hannah was gonna play a role. Before the taste perception phase, Hannah would cry and the experimenters would ask why. She’d say she recently found out about her brother’s terminal illness. Increasingly emotional, Hannah asked to be excused from the experiment. In this version, even though the participants still witnessed Dan cheating, they did not pour bigger amounts of hot sauce in the taste perception phase.

What does this show? First, the compassion that the participants felt predicted how much hot sauce they were going to give to another person. And second, more importantly, the compassion that people feel towards one person can predict how they will act towards others.

This experiment is only one of many studies that are now delving into the idea and reality of compassion. Recently, a conference has even been held to discuss it, joined by representatives from different fields such as evolutionary psychologists, clinical psychologists who deal with children suffering from trauma, charity owners who conduct social and emotional skills workshops for the youth, and others.

Using brain scans, one doctor even explained how different parts of the brain are activated when people are in a “compassionate state” or “non-compassionate state.” So interestingly enough, compassion actually seems to have physiological, neurological effects.

But now here’s the thing. My personal epiphany, if you will. We can participate in all these discussions, conduct our own experiments if we’re in the field, compile all these data, but maybe it’ll be a bit more exciting to see for ourselves. There’s all this science about compassion, we know that. But somehow I think the reality of compassion can’t be proven by numbers. Tall order but maybe here’s what we can do: go out there, help people out, and prove it for ourselves.

If you are interested in reading more scientific information about kindness or compassion, here’s a list of various quantitative and qualitative studies about the topic. Then again, if you are more keen to join the action, check out the BeepBeep Nation app and this fun video on how to get started. You might be surprised at the many ways you’ll see how compassion exists.

 

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Organic Matter Found on Mars — Two NASA Studies

For many decades, the idea of life outside Earth has intrigued many of us, but most especially scientists, astronomers, and well, sci-fi writers. For them and other Mars enthusiasts (a.k.a. people who eagerly believe that Mars can harbor life), the recent year has shown us great updates. Snow has been discovered in the planet. Soil made to simulate the planet’s conditions has grown earthworms.

Due to updates like these, some organizations are being inspired to plan ahead for life on Mars. MIT designed dome forests that will adapt to the environment there. The UAE is building a Mars-like metropolis as well, in preparation for a future in that planet. And it looks like they are bound to be more inspired as NASA releases the results of two new major studies about the Red Planet in the journal Science.

The first study centers on methane, a simple organic molecule that forms the basis for natural gas. Biological sources produce most of the methane on Earth, so researchers suspected that methane on Mars could point them towards biological sources — life! — on Mars.

Astronomers were already detecting methane in Mars as far back as 2003, but they first confirmed its presence there in 2015. After analyzing years worth of data, they realized that the methane was probably coming from pockets of ice. When these ice pockets melt during “summer” in Mars, methane slips out and methane levels go higher. Scientists say the seasonal presence of methane might clue us in on how there used to be life in the Red Planet, though the current study is still inconclusive about that.

The next study, however, also implies the idea of ancient life, as scientists find evidence of organic matter in soil that came from Mars.

In the second study, [NASA’s Curiosity rover] collected soil samples from two spots in Gale crater estimated to be about three billion years old. When Curiosity heated them up, the researchers recognized several organic molecules commonly found in Earth’s organic-rich sedimentary rock.

The discovery of methane in the Martian atmosphere and organic matter on Martian soil suggests interesting similarities between that planet and ours. Thus, it further spurs the question of life on Mars. And since the Curiosity rover is still roving around and looking for signs, one can only hope its next breakthrough will finally answer that question.

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Newfound Ocean Zone Home to 100 Species

Just a while ago, a previously unexplored region of the Indian Ocean gave us more than 11 new species to look forward to reading about, including crustaceans with fascinating appearances and others. This is an amazing breakthrough for marine biology. But accomplishments in the field just seem to keep coming, as scientists from Oxford University travel Bermudian waters to discover a new area.

But that’s not yet the amazing part — the newfound ocean zone they call Rariphotic Zone (or rare light zone) seems to be home to 100 previously unknown species as well.

[M]ore than 100 new species were discovered including tanaids – minute crustaceans – dozens of new algae species and black wire coral that stand up to two metres high . . . The survey team spent hundreds of hours underwater, either scuba diving or using submersibles and remote operated vehicles which can reach depths of 6,500 feet (2,000m).

The team of marine biologists also found a huge algal forest on an underwater mountain about 15 miles from the Bermudian coast. Gardens of corals populated by urchins, eels, crabs, fish, and other creatures were also discovered to exist on this mountain’s slopes. For reference, the world has a total of around 100,000 underwater mountains, with only 50 that have been intimately explored by scientists.

Alex Rogers, Professor of Conservation Biology at Oxford University and scientific director of Nekton — the British charity which organized the ocean exploration trip — has a rightful opinion. The discovery of an entirely new ocean zone forwards the idea that there is far more diversity to look into. We may not have even laid eyes on so many ocean species.

“The average depth of the ocean is 4,200m. If life in the shallower regions of the deep sea is so poorly documented it undermines confidence in our existing understanding of how the patterns of life change with depth,” he added.

“[This is] evidence of how little we know and how important it is to document this unknown frontier to ensure that its future is protected”.

What he’s saying is very significant. Huge actions towards marine conservation are happening, such as Australia’s 500 million dollar pledge to the protection of the Great Barrier Reef. But if we really want to protect the oceans and marine life, first we need to know in detail what we are protecting. And there is so much left to know.

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Man Builds Free Prosthetics For Kids

We all know prosthetics don’t make for an affordable buy. They start at roughly $1,500 for animals, which means devices for humans are expectedly high-priced. To ease the physical and financial burden on young amputees, Stephen Davis builds them prosthetics — for free!

“We build them in a range of colors, whatever the child needs,” Designs he’s created have included Iron Man, Lego, and Spider-Man themes. He’s even built glow-in-the-dark arms.

When Davis posted online about the lack of options for people who needed prosthetics, an e-NABLE volunteer named Drew Murray saw his frustrations and together, they ended up building Team UnLimbited. The team uses a 3D printer to create the free prosthetics.

While the loss of a limb is definitely not cool, these funky prosthetic limbs sure seem to be. Davis, born without a left hand, covers the costs of printing himself, along with donations received by Team UnLimbited. He expects nothing in return (except maybe a sobbing parent).

“Our arms are specifically designed to stand out [and] show off a child’s personality,” Stephen [said] . . . They are also made to be easily usable and lightweight.

Did I mention his prosthetic template is free to use online? He may be modest, but Davis is nothing short of a miracle worker.

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