Don’t Panic! Dealing with Emergencies through the BeepBeep Nation App

At least once in our lives, I’m sure we have experienced feeling utterly helpless. It may be because we’re alone in an unfamiliar place. It may be because we forgot something vital to our current situation. Other times, it may be because we just downright panic when dealing with emergencies, especially big ones. Panic, unfortunately, often aggravates whatever problem we face. It’s crippling. It might even be dangerous.

But just like how technology has an answer to everything, there might finally be a way to train our minds not to head straight to panic and instead, immediately consider our options and seek help. Especially when there’s an app that’s ready to answer to our needs during any particular crisis  — check out the BeepBeep Nation app.

The BeepBeep Nation App not only offers a platform for people to get the help they need on a daily basis like a ride to work or restaurant recommendations, it can also effectively assist you in dealing with emergencies. That’s what makes it distinct from other service-providing apps. Here’s a list of just some things BeepBeep Nation can help with:

  1. Vehicle breakdown

Not all of us can change a flat tire. Some of us may not even have backup tires ready all the time (though I highly discourage that!). Other times, it may be a serious vehicular damage we’ve never seen before so we have no idea how to fix. Needless to say, you can easily imagine how frustrating it is when your vehicle breaks down and you’re not sure what to do or whom to call for help.

But through BeepBeep Nation, you can simply beep out a help request and users near you will offer to assist with your car problems. Because user responses are always real-time, you can get help anytime. All you need to do are specify some details including these: your vehicle type, your exact location, and your exact problem. It would also help if you can identify if your vehicle needs towing or if you’ve already thought of a solution that you just don’t know how to reach. Let all these facts be known in your beep, and more effective help will arrive more quickly.

Simple, right? Now you can avoid hyperventilating inside a broken down car and instantly be able to deal with it.

2. Medical emergency

Perhaps another more panic-inducing, possibly more hazardous situation is a medical emergency. Whether it’s you, a companion, or someone else that needs medical attention, swift responses are always, always necessary. Every second matters, especially if you’re not certain how serious the case happens to be.

Through BeepBeep Nation, you can quickly receive help from a medic nearby. While waiting for the ambulance to arrive during severe medical problems, for instance, you can beep out a help request for instant first aid response. Of course, there may be times that all you need is a little assistance from a medical officer. Whichever the case, BeepBeep Nation is there to guide you in dealing with emergencies. Check out the illustration above for some of the medical issues that it can help you with.

3. Missing persons or pets

I know, I know. Not panicking when someone you love goes missing is easier said than done. But just keep in mind that blanking out due to extreme emotions isn’t really going to make things better. So after the initial burst, maybe take the time to take care of yourself and calm down first. Because what the situation calls for, as per usual, is action. And BeepBeep Nation provides you a platform to do that.

It will be very helpful to promptly beep out a request on the app when you can’t find a family member or your beloved pet. Specify some necessary details: what they look like, when and where you last saw them, what they were wearing at the time, and other facts that can help BeepBeep Nation users to identify them.

Coming soon to app stores near you, BeepBeep Nation will truly be a life-changing app. Not only can it help requestors attend to their more common everyday needs, helpers to feel good about themselves when helping out, and both of them to socialize and enjoy face-to-face interaction with others, it has a plethora of other important features. And as we’ve seen, one thing it can really help with is dealing with emergencies. Who knows, because we are finally equipped to handle them and avoid panic, BeepBeep Nation might even eventually jumpstart a change in our mindsets.

For now, check out the EMINENT (EMN) token — fuel for the BeepBeep Nation app. Pre-sale is currently live. Don’t hesitate to participate in a world of change. Get started now!

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Too Many Apps? Cluttered Phone Screen? Here’s What to Do.

I am a firm believer of the “messy desk, messy head” mantra. In my regular working schedule, I always make sure to set a 10 to 15-minute break to put those sticky notes back where they belong, throw out random scribbles from when I tried to conjure ideas for my next article, file those printouts that I forgot about yesterday, create a clearing for my laptop in the middle of the table (thereby clearing my head as well), etc etc. Everything has to be in place so that I myself can be in place and finally write.

And in my everyday life, I bring the mantra not just to work but everywhere. My fridge and kitchen cupboard are extremely organized. And you know who else isn’t exempted from my powers? Shelly.

Shelly, my phone. (It’s a play on both the second syllable of my first name Rachel and the first syllable of the word cellphone. So –chel, cell-, Shelly. Get it? No? Fine,the name’s lame.) Took me long enough before I got tired of swiping and swiping as I ultimately try to find the app I need. Eyes hurting, I even become dizzy at times. Finally, I realized, there has to be some way to save time from gazing at an endless pool of apps and icons before I can do what I need to do.

And I’m sure it’s not just me. You probably needed to open your chat messages for an important bestie update, only to get lost for more seconds than necessary. And honestly, how many of us have a phone screen that truly serves some eyesore? Well, not mine anymore. So here are some tips to get rid of that clutter.

1. Delete what you don’t need.

Sure, you need your fond memories of that cutesy kitten game even though you no longer have time to actually play it. And sure, there’s the cupcake game, too. And who knows? You and Bry might just break up soon (even though you’ve been going strong for months now), so you don’t want to delete any of your three dating apps yet. Three! Question is: do you really want to be an app hoarder?

Ever since I found out and wrote about the Swedish concept of lagom eons ago — fine, just a few weeks ago — I tried integrating ideas of moderation and necessity with my lifestyle. It has worked so well so far. Even with my phone screen. So evaluate your apps. Think about the ones you truly and regularly need. Get rid of those you don’t. Again, don’t be an app hoarder. Chances are, even if you change your mind, you can just download it again sometime. But right now, what you need is peace of mind. And eyes. Your eyes need peace.

2. Folders, folders, folders.

If you have an active technological lifestyle, and your preoccupations really have bits to do with your phone, at least have the energy to file your apps into neat folders. Create categories that are relevant to you. For example, bundle your cooking and food-related apps together. Make a separate folder for your news apps. Make another for your social media accounts. And if you really can’t get rid of the kittens and cupcakes, just make sure they are where they need to be.

3. Download the BeepBeep Nation App.

These days, there is an app for everything. You need a ride? Get this app. You need to find a place to stay next weekend? Download this one. You need reviews of restaurants? Download another. And while it has been very convenient for us to get the services we need in the span of some taps, things might just get a bit more convenient.

The BeepBeep Nation App provides an easy way for people to get help and give help. And in different ways too, which makes it extremely efficient. Known as “The Mother of All Apps,” it covers many categories of your daily problems such as finding a ride and a place to stay, reading restaurant reviews, getting accurate information, and even receiving first aid in medical emergencies.

And while it’s amazing that one app covers all that and you now have reason to declutter your phone screen, what’s even more amazing is that you can get help for free. Visit the BeepBeep Nation website to find out more. In the meantime, go put your organizing fingers on, start deleting and categorizing on your phone screen, and finally address that eyesore.

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Technology Doesn’t Have to Make Us Less Human

Recently, I featured the EMINENT (EMN) token — a token that would get us all started on creating kindness in the world — in an article that talks about how technology and compassion could meet. To be honest, what fascinates me about technology is not just how it makes things convenient and efficient for our daily lives, not just how it gives us so much information and immediate access to everything in the blink of an eye, but also how it could improve our humanity.

I know it seems like a paradox. Facing a computer or phone screen all day could surely make you less human, right? My mom likes to say that we are all slowly becoming less human and more robot in this day and age. But I beg to disagree. So for this one, I will list down some of my favorite apps and how their functions actually encourage, promote, and deepen our sense of humanity.

1. Seek

We’ve all probably seen movies or read books that describe a technological dystopia as a world less human, dominated by robots, androids, cyborgs and other metal stuff. No more organic or natural. Everything is machine. But what’s so interesting about Seek, an app developed by iNaturalist.org, is that it shows the very opposite side of technology.

iNaturalist.org is a virtual community of nature lovers where people share information on nature-related projects in their respective cities, post observations of animals and plants around them, and contribute to archives of scientific data. The app Seek offers the same thing, except gamified. It “encourages outdoor exploration and learning by harnessing image recognition technology” where you could earn badges as you capture photos of more species and learn cool trivia about them afterwards.

Now who’s to say technology will take us away from nature?

2. DailyArt

My mom also likes to complain that today’s generation doesn’t know how to appreciate culture the way previous generations did. The pleasure of reading is reduced to clickbait. Our passions all just revolve around video games and social media. Even our music sounds electronic. There might be truth to those statements, but again, I don’t think it’s necessarily the case.

DailyArt is a good testament. By providing a daily dose of art history, it inspires a whole new generation of prospective artists and art critics through technology. It features one classic masterpiece everyday (you can make it part of your morning routine), loads and loads of fascinating stories about painters and their paintings, and even create your own gallery of your favorite ones. Plus, you can also share them to your friends on social media.

Point is, being very invested in online participation doesn’t really have to distance us from human pursuits such as art. Sometimes, we can even improve our skills and interests through virtual means.

3. Calm

Awarded by Apple as 2017’s App of the Year, Calm offers meditation techniques for sleep, relaxation, and stress reduction. It teaches you how to be mindful and release anxiety, reflect your emotions, be in touch with your body and your senses, relax your muscles, and many other methods.

Contrary to popular belief, technology doesn’t always bombard us with excessive activity or push us into being crazy busy; sometimes it also provides us avenues for feeling rejuvenated and refreshed.

4. BeepBeep Nation

Soon to launch, the BeepBeep Nation app will offer people opportunities to get help and give help to others in need. With just one beep, you can request for whatever type of help such as getting a ride home or reading restaurant recommendations. Underneath that function, however, what BeepBeep Nation really aims to do is make the world a better place by encouraging face-to-face social interactions and a strong culture of kindness. By helping others, you get to meet new people and widen your circle of friends, or even just have a healthy, engaging conversation.

Again, who’s to say technology will keep us apart and make us less human? It might just bring us closer together.

Some apps nurture and promote human interests such as love for nature or the arts. Other apps help us towards reflection and introspection, letting us deeper into ourselves. Others can even help us build personal relationships with others, and not only on a virtual level, but face-to-face.

A lot of these apps, though only made possible through technology, surpass our preconceived ideas of a digital future. Rather than decrease our humanity, technology might even have the ability to make us feel even more human.

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Helpers, Requestors, and Spontaneous Friendships

In a world where we’d rather send links to interesting articles and random memes to our friends, pester them in our chatboxes, and click the “Like” button on their vacation photos, it’s hard to remember what the old times were like. Even though we still meet up every now and then with friends for coffee or cocktails and catching up on each other’s lives, one thing I do miss is experiencing spontaneous friendships.

I know part of adult friendships is really just exerting small efforts to maintain your high school or college peers, or perhaps revelling in your co-workers’ company for Friday nights. Meeting new friends is almost out of the question. (The only new people we let into our lives are mostly new business affiliates. At least that’s what happens with me.) But I can’t help but wax nostalgic about the times when you would randomly talk to someone, discover that they’re super interesting and that you jive so well, and then exchange contact details. Where are those circumstances now?

I mean, I’m aware that online friendships are not so bad. I see my teenage niece and nephew spend hours on Twitter and I wouldn’t berate them for it. They get the online social life that they need. But I can’t help but ask if they ever wonder about some kind of bonding other than their friends tweeting about their dog or Snapchatting their sandwiches. Do they even go to sneaky house parties nowadays? Kidding. But on a more serious note, I think technology brings people closer together, but it also maintains this distance between people somehow.

That’s why the BeepBeep Nation app is an amazing project to look forward to. Not only does it offer a platform for people to request for the specific kind of help they need — like perhaps sharing a ride or having a tour guide — and then for other people near the area to respond, it does so with an exciting motive in mind. Let’s see what the creators have to say:

[We’re returning] our users to the days when being social means actually meeting up in person and talking to each other face to face, instead of doing it mainly through the screen of a smartphone and hardly ever seeing each other.

[I]n what appears to be a paradox, we’re using cold technology itself to enhance warm human values and human interaction in ways that are far removed from the technology itself.

The people who beep when they need something are called requestors, while the people who provide help are called helpers. BeepBeep nation aims to foster dynamic and spontaneous friendships between requestors and helpers, as everytime a need arises, so does the opportunity to get to know someone new. At the end of the day, not only do you get the help you need or feel good for helping, you just might create new and exciting friendships.

So here’s to prospective requestors: don’t be afraid. Your hands might be full to do a particular thing, so look for an extra hand. It’s actually a sign of maturity to realize you can’t do everything alone. Seek help and if you want, you can give your helper a gratitude tip, you can simply say thanks, or maybe keep in touch. Not only can asking for help make you feel human, it will also show your interest in other humans who can be there for you.

And here’s to prospective helpers: it doesn’t have to be a big effort to help out. Sometimes, you may not even have to go out of your way. Shopping for a requestor’s item at a store you’re going to anyway doesn’t cost any extra time, right? Not only can doing a little kindness make you feel good, you can also inspire the person you’re helping to pay the kindness forward. And what’s a tiny favor in exchange for possibly great, spontaneous friendships?

And of course, while the guarantee of friendship still depends on the people involved, at the very least requestors and helpers could have a random, engaging conversation for the day. What’s not to love about that?

To get started on BeepBeep Nation, find out more about the EMINENT token a.k.a. fuel for the amazing app. Coming soon in selected cities worldwide!

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The EMINENT token: Your Token to Creating Kindness

Today, it’s almost impossible to imagine a world where progress isn’t defined by how far we’ve come along with technology. It’s simply true that gigantic technological developments such as the Internet and its plethora of facets have given us convenience in ways that previous generations of people have only begun to imagine.

It’s undeniable that in a huge way, the Internet shapes the way our global economies and political landscapes are evolving. However, in small ways, it also shapes how people interact with each other now. Insofar as technology sometimes gets in the way of real face-to-face social interactions, it also has the enormous potential of improving our relationships.

The BeepBeep Nation app wants to utilize that potential in its mission of making the world a better place. By providing a platform to connect a person who needs help (requestor) and a help provider (helper), it promotes and encourages a helping economy. With this, every kind of help is always just one beep away. Simply put, the app offers the means towards sharing our lives to others and creating kindness in the world.

And how do we get started? A token especially made to fuel the BeepBeep Nation app will be launched soon, and it will be our token to creating kindness and experiencing human interaction on a whole new level of warmth. The EMINENT (EMN) token will be used by requestors to pay for their help requests called Beeps or to give Gratitude Tips to their helpers, though the latter is not required. After all, the goal is to build this helping economy on the willingness of people to help out.

Cashless, seamless, and convenient for users, the EMINENT (EMN) token fuels the BeepBeep Nation app and enables people to be more compassionate in a truly efficient and effective way. With just the push of a button, you can easily ask for help from people nearby or easily offer help to those who need it. By constantly giving people opportunities to help out,  wherever they may be and whatever kind of help is needed, the EMINENT token will ultimately fuel a culture of kindness. By joining the mission of creating kindness in the world, people will be able to lead more fulfilled, meaningful lives.

The word”EMINENT,” if used in the context of a person, means “respected”; and as an attribute of a person, it represents a positive quality that is noticeable. EMINENT is what BeepBeep Nation users should aspire to be when they use the app. And it might only take a little effort to get going on creating kindness and being eminent, yet the results might be huge. After all, through the EMINENT token and the BeepBeep Nation app, we could see a future where kindness is shared everyday, human-to-human. A future where the world functions on both technology and compassion.

I’m sure all of us have reasons to help people in need. They might include these: being able to make new friends or business contacts, getting to have a truly engaging conversation with someone, feeling good about doing something good, and most importantly, participating in an inspiring mission of planting seeds of compassion in the world. So don’t be afraid to contribute to this helping economy soon, for yourself and for others.

Creating kindness through the EMINENT (EMN) token is not only convenient, it might just make big waves of change. Truly, with just one Beep, you could make the world a better place. ICO coming soon!

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Extreme Diet Reversed Diabetes in 86% of Patients

For many folks, a “plant-based” or “Mediterranean” diet has been proven by nutritionists as the healthiest. It is linked to many benefits including healthy aging, lower risk of heart disease, improved cognitive function, slower neurodegeneration, and many others. However, for some people who have specific conditions, other regimen — perhaps in some cases, a more extreme diet — may be necessary.

That was the finding of a clinical trial from last year which involved patients with type 2 diabetes. The disease is believed to be reversible even with those who have had it for years, and the trial which made patients engage in an extreme diet attests to this belief; about 86% of those who took part in the study arrived at remission.

“These findings are very exciting,” said diabetes researcher Roy Taylor from Newcastle University. “They could revolutionise the way type 2 diabetes is treated.”

298 adults (20-65 years old) who had been diagnosed with type 2 diabetes within the previous six years participated in the Diabetes Remission Clinical Trial (DiRECT). The participants were randomly assigned to a control group who went under the usual diabetic care or to an experimental group who went under an intensive weight management program. The latter group had to limit their food consumption to 825-853 calories for about three to five months, taking only health shakes and soups.

After this extreme diet, they were slowly reintroduced to more food for a period of two to eight weeks. Alongside it, cognitive behavioral therapy was also provided so that the patients may continue their weight loss and improve their level of physical activity.

Almost 90 percent [or about 86 percent] of those who lost 15 kilograms (33 lbs) or more, successfully reversed their type 2 diabetes. More than half (57 percent) of those dropping 10 to 15 kilograms (22 to 33 lbs) achieved remission also . . .  the control group receiving standard diabetic care management only saw a 4 percent remission rate . . . the average weight loss in the weight management group was 10 kilograms — whereas the control group participants only lost 1 kilogram.

Of course, the remission might not be permanent if patients revert back to unhealthy eating. But the researchers were able to conclude this: dietary intervention can help develop treatment options for type 2 diabetes, a disease that is no longer lifelong or chronic, but ultimately reversible.

The DiRECT program will continue to monitor the groups’ weight loss success and diabetes status. Now here’s to hoping the participants are on the direct path to healthier lifestyles.

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Helping Out: the Latest Lifestyle Trend

Every so often, I write about a current or emerging lifestyle trend that isn’t only able to influence our own personal choices but also to shape the culture we engage with. In fact, this is one of my favorite topics to write about. It’s certainly my life goal to stay trendy and support sustainability at the same time, and I love spreading the word about it. Here are some of the lifestyle trends that I’ve previously written about and remain beloved to me:

1. Sustainable fashion

Making your wardrobe eco-friendly isn’t really as difficult as it sounds. The key, as I often point out in other aspects of daily life, is to organize. From your old ones, pick your favorite and essential clothing items then decide on what you don’t need. Go on to sell or donate them. Whatever you do, don’t throw stuff away!

As for shopping for new items, be aware of your sources. Do your research in advance. Shopping local is usually a good way to support the community. Avoiding items that might have come from animal cruelty is a good principle. At the end, I guess it’s a matter of principle and knowing which fashion companies mirror yours.

2. Food choices — organic, local, and balanced

Sustainability, though it is also seen in other aspects of daily life like fashion, most often comes up in conversations about food choices. So it’s safe to say updating your lifestyle means supporting sustainable food production. Millennials, they say, are effecting some big changes in the food industry: they opt out of GMOs, go organic, and support local. And I believe those are very good choices. Now more than ever, people are encouraged to produce their own food by growing their own gardens and such.

However, in addition to sustainable, what should food choices be if not healthy? Research says that a Mediterranean or a plant-based meal plan can give us the most health benefits. So don’t go for those heavily advertised crash diets. Choose the most balanced — thus sustainable — one for your body as well.

3. All-around mindset

Here’s the thing. Doing healthy things and following lifestyle trends without reflecting on why you do them could suffice, but they cannot ensure  long-lasting effects on your well-being. What’s really important is how you think about your life and how you let that process manifest into actual decisions. Some things that really helped me be more conscious of my choices are lagom and mindfulness. Lagom has helped me achieve balance in my daily life — from arranging my apartment furniture to reducing my work-related stress. Mindfulness has helped me embrace my mental illness, commit to a self-care regimen, and even seek help when I need it.

Now you may ask, why am I listing all of these things? It’s because I want to reflect further on what makes a certain lifestyle trend so important to me. And I’ve been thinking, in the end, it’s all about kindness, isn’t it? Sustainable fashion is all about being kind to the earth. Sustainable food choices is about being kind not only to the environment, but to your own body as well. Certain mindsets like lagom and mindfulness are about being kind to yourself and the people that you love and that love you.

I realize, maybe the next thing that I want to commit to is being kind beyond my self and my inner circle. So here’s another lifestyle trend that I believe should go viral:

4. Kindness, kindness, kindness.

Maybe it’s not even simply the latest lifestyle trend, maybe kindness is a more timeless choice that we need to make chic now. After all, it even has some amazing health benefits. So go outside and volunteer. Help out a stranger in need — whether he is in a medical emergency or simply needs a ride home — because you don’t know what impact it will make on his life. And for the matter, you don’t know what impact it will make on the world. Maybe one little favor can push someone to pay it forward and eventually end up creating an entire culture of helping other people out.

Sustainable fashion or food choices make us feel good, but what can make us feel better than being compassionate to others? And in the way that choosing organic for your salad today can be great for the environment, helping someone out may end up making the world better. Now that’s chic.

Final tip: you can actually use technology to start on this kindness lifestyle. Use the BeepBeep Nation app in reaching out to those who need your help, and learn more about the EMINENT token to get started. And hey, honestly, helping out has never been this trendy.

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Making a Better World One Beep at a Time

Last time, I wrote about little ways to answer this big question: how do I find my purpose in life? Simply reading books or going outside may be a far cry from what you expect of an intense introspection, but it won’t hurt to try. And even if it doesn’t enlighten you about the meaning of your own life, well, at least you got to enjoy your day.

I myself have gone on the life purpose spiral quite a few times, even as a woman whose business is doing okay and whose family gets along well, and it has led me before to another particular question. Am I being selfish when I concentrate on my personal life? What if my purpose in this world has to do with being more in the world, whatever that means?

More daunting than discovering your life path, perhaps, is asking this: what can I do to help make a better world? I know, I know. With bills to pay and children to raise, it seems like too much. Most of us are not presidents or billionaires; it’s not part of our everyday routine to have great impact on making a better world. But, as with all things, it can’t hurt to start small. As long as you start. I think, even in our ordinariness, there is much to be done.

It’s okay to focus first on those near you. Do more for the people you love. Cook your friends a hearty meal and have everyone get together, just like the old times. It may not seem like much, but in a world where interactions mostly happen through chat or our newsfeed, it’s a radical step to foster social bonds. Leave a sweet note in your kid’s lunch. Your baby girl or baby boy might be having a bad day in school, and needs to be cheered up. Who knows, they might remember small acts like this in the future and use it someday as inspiration to fuel their own dreams of creating a better world. Never underestimate the loving things you do for your inner circle.

Never underestimate the power of a smile, either. I know, I know. That seems cliche. But niceness is definitely a good icebreaker. Make a stranger’s day better by greeting them a good morning. Ask an acquaintance how they’re doing, mean it, and really listen. Spend time with the elderly, hold their hand, and enjoy their stories — there is much to learn and they have much to share. Praise your co-worker for his or her hard work this week. Again, in a world where it’s so easy to hate and judge, showing someone your attention and appreciation could be a big thing.

Yes, society has much, much bigger problems than stray kittens. All over the world, political, cultural, and economic tensions exist. But remember that small changes are still changes. You may not have the resources to fly to a third world country and start a charity, but you can go to your local health center and donate blood. You may not have the time to arrange a fundraising event for the environment, but surely you can eliminate your use of plastic. If you are good at certain skills, mentor or coach someone in your community. If you do have the resources, make sure you donate them to foundations with causes you feel the most about. Again, if you don’t, you can always share your knowledge. Advocate. Raise awareness.

And keep being aware. There are always new ways to make a difference. With the pace that technology is evolving, I’m sure the industry also wants to do its part in making a better world. Keep your eyes peeled for these opportunities. One such app to join the mission of making a difference and offer us opportunities to do so is BeepBeep Nation.

The BeepBeep Nation app provides a platform for people to request for help whenever they need it — and in whatever form, such as needing a ride or a place to stay — and for other people to respond and help out. It hopes to redefine and encourage human interaction in the technological age, through technology itself. Visit the BeepBeep Nation website to find out more about how to make a difference in the world, one beep at a time.

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The Science of Gratitude (or Why It’s So Healthy to Say Thanks)

When I was a kid, my parents taught me what they call “magic words.” This includes saying please, I’m sorry, and most importantly, thank you. Vague memories of preschool also have a similar lesson; I remember my playmates and I practicing that habit as encouraged by our awesome teacher Mrs. Silverstone. When Nick lets you borrow his toy truck, say thank you. When Amy shares her fruit bites, say thank you. When Karl and Jessica make you join in their game involving color blocks, say thank you.

I myself don’t have a kid yet, but I’m pretty sure I’ll definitely teach my son or daughter the same thing. Especially after reading stuff here and there proving that something like it really exists — the science of gratitude.

In a research study involving around 300 adults who sought psychological counselling services at a university, it has been found that feelings of gratitude do not only help well-adjusted individuals, but also those who had mental health concerns. The participants — most of whom reported clinically low levels of mental health, and struggled with depression and anxiety — were divided into three groups. Although all three groups received counselling services, Group 1 was additionally asked to write one letter of gratitude every week. Group 2 was asked to write about their deepest negative thoughts and feelings. Group 3 didn’t do any writing.

Those who wrote gratitude letters reported significantly better mental health four weeks and 12 weeks after the writing exercise ended. The researchers then decided to delve into the more physical science of gratitude  and found out that their gratitude exercise had actual lasting effects on the brain. Using an fMRI scanner to analyze how the participants’ brains were processing information, the researchers asked Group 1 (gratitude letter writers) and Group 3 (people who didn’t write) to do “pay-it-forward” tasks. They were to be given money by a benefactor, and they can decide how much of it they were going to give back to a cause of their choice.

The researchers found out that across participants, the brain activity of people who felt grateful and the brain activity of people who felt mostly guilty and obligated to do the task were very distinct. When grateful people donated more, their medial prefrontal cortex became more sensitive. This is a part of the brain associated with learning and decision-making. Interestingly, this higher sensitivity was also more identified in the group who were gratitude letter writers in the previous experiment.

Other studies involving the science of gratitude also yielded fascinating results. It has been linked to better quality of sleep, as well as decreased blood pressure. And in seeming accordance with the neurological findings of the study I described a while ago, gratitude has been linked to a boost in willpower and impulse control, helping people make better decisions like avoiding overeating, exercising more and attending regular checkups.

So don’t be afraid to need help. What’s important is to remember to feel grateful and to express it to the people who are there for you.

If you want to read more about the science of gratitude, here’s a link to various research projects. If you want to participate in a cause that encourages people to get help and feel grateful, check out the BeepBeep Nation App. It provides a platform for people to request for the help they need (called requestors) and for other people to respond (called helpers).

Once the task is done, requestors may give a gratitude tip to their helpers. However, it’s not mandatory, because as we have seen scientifically, gratitude is so much more real if it’s willingly felt and reciprocated. Of course, requestors themselves may also want to be helpers to somebody else if they want to pay it forward. Visit this article to know more about BeepBeep Nation’s take on motivation and gratitude.

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5 Amazing Health Benefits of Lending a Hand

I don’t know about you, but providing help to those who need it is an fulfilling experience for sure. Whether it’s helping an old lady reach a food item at the top of the grocery shelf, volunteering at a nearby animal shelter, or organizing my own fundraising event, acts of kindness make me feel super good. If you feel the same, have you ever asked yourself why?

Well, there are probably many reasons — social, cultural, philosophical, spiritual, and the like. But did you know lending a hand also has some amazing health benefits? Let me list some of them.

1. Kindness makes you happier (through your brain chemicals!)

There’s something called the helper’s high, which is typically identified as a state of euphoria after doing something good. Charitable acts usually raise your dopamine levels, which gives you the same feeling you have after an intense exercise. Kindness also boosts the production of serotonin, which calms you down and lifts your mood.

2. Kindness lowers the risk of heart disease.

This one can be credited to a hormone called oxytocin which, when transmitted to the brain, facilitates social bonding and emotion recognition.  This means that when you’re in love, for instance, you’re producing oxytocin. Now interesting research has found that oxytocin also has a huge role in the cardiovascular system; it is also produced in the heart. Once it travels through our blood vessels, it supposedly increases nitric oxide production which reduces your blood pressure.

So yeah. I suppose making a stranger smile today can keep the cardiologist away.

3. Kindness boosts your immune system.

Some experiments proved that even just thinking kind and loving thoughts towards people around you or watching other people show compassion have some great health benefits. It helps you have better heart rate variability and also raises your protective antibodies, both of which mean enhanced immune responses. Amazing, right?

4. Kindness makes you less anxious.

Doing good deeds have been proven to lower social anxiety. People who are socially anxious are not only shy, they tend to fear social interactions. But kindness helps them break these barriers. Some experiments have this cool conclusion: after trying to perform kind acts, anxious people tended to view social interactions in a new light.

5. Kindness can literally ease pain.

We already know that giving and receiving help makes us feel good because we realize that we are not alone when we suffer, that people are there for us. But medically speaking, kinder people also tend to have lessened physical suffering. People who volunteer tend to report less body aches and pains. And interestingly enough, those volunteers aged 55 and above have also been noted to have a 44% lower likelihood of death i.e. longer, healthier lives. I mean, wow.

I guess what’s surprising about researching all of it is this: contrary to popular belief, helping actually seems more beneficial to givers or helpers than to receivers. There might not be any obvious reward when you act kindly, but these health benefits far outweigh anything material and instant that you could get in return. So don’t worry, just keep doing kind things. It’s good for your heart. Literally.

If you’re looking for more ways to offer or receive help, check out the BeepBeep Nation App and this video on how to get started. You might not profit immediately, but these health benefits will surely be good for you in the long run.

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